Electric Force Equilibrium

  • #1
SIUnitConvert
3
0

Homework Statement


Two identical conducting small spheres are placed with their centers .300 m apart. One is given a charge of 12.0 nC and the other is given a charge of -18.0nC. a) Find the electric foce exterted on one sphere by the other. B) the sphers are connected by a conducing wire. Find the electric force between the two after they have come to equilibrium.



Homework Equations


F=(((q1)(q2))/r^2)(8.99 x 10^9 N M^2/c^2)



The Attempt at a Solution


I used the above equation to calculate the charge to be -2.1576 x 10^5 N. for problem A. For B, I am curious if I'm simplyfying to much, but since there is equilibrium would the resulting charge be zero?

Thank you for the help!
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
voko
6,054
391
The resultant charge is the sum of the original charges. What is it?
 
  • #3
SIUnitConvert
3
0
-6.0 nC because there is still a disproportionate number of electrons within the system? Is it found by adding the two forces together?
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Muphrid
834
2
It's -6.0 nC because one sphere had +12 and the other had -18. The total charge of the system must be conserved.

You need to figure out how this charge is divided between the two spheres, though.
 
  • #5
SIUnitConvert
3
0
Is it an even -3.0nC charge in each sphere because the spheres and the connecting wire are both conductive so the electrons are equally spaced?

Then using the -3.0nC in the original formula as both q1 and q2 to calculate the new repulsive force?
 

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