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Electric potential problem

  1. Aug 21, 2016 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    In the figure, a metal sphere with charge q=https://edugen.wileyplus.com/edugen/shared/assignment/test/session.quest2561214entrance1_N10031.mml?size=14&ver=1471825532267&algorithm=1&rnd=1471825539091 [Broken] μC and radius r=https://edugen.wileyplus.com/edugen/shared/assignment/test/session.quest2561214entrance1_N1003F.mml?size=14&ver=1471825532267&algorithm=1&rnd=1471825539091 [Broken] cm is concentric with a larger metal sphere with charge Q=https://edugen.wileyplus.com/edugen/shared/assignment/test/session.quest2561214entrance1_N1004D.mml?size=14&ver=1471825532267&algorithm=1&rnd=1471825539091 [Broken] μC and radius R=https://edugen.wileyplus.com/edugen/shared/assignment/test/session.quest2561214entrance1_N1005B.mml?size=14&ver=1471825532267&algorithm=1&rnd=1471825539091 [Broken]cm. (a) What is the magnitude of the potential difference between the spheres? If we connect the spheres with a wire, what then is the charge on (b) the smaller sphere and (c) the larger sphere?

    2. Relevant equations
    V=k*(q/r)

    3. The attempt at a solution
    I got b and c correct, it is just part a that I am confused. The question ask for the potential difference between the two sphere, so i simply took the difference. ΔV=k*(Q/R - q/r)=7.8E5, please help me understand why this is not the correct answer. Thanks
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 21, 2016 #2

    Paul Colby

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    Gold Member

    The potential change (difference) is the work it takes to move a unit of charge from one point to another. How would you calculate that work?
     
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