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Electricity and Magnetism

  1. Apr 25, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A charged particle moves in a straight line through a particular region of space. Could there be a nonzero magnetic field in this region? In either case, include a sketch as well as prose in your justification.


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    The force that a magnetic field exerts on a charged particle moving through it is given by F=qvB, sin theta = qvB where B is the component of the field perpendicular to the particle’s velocity. Since the particle moves in a straight line the magnetic force must be zero.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 25, 2014 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    OK.

    The magnetic force is zero. What about the field?
     
  4. Apr 25, 2014 #3

    BiGyElLoWhAt

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    Gold Member

    Hmmm...
    Another way to look at that relationship is ##\vec{F}=q\vec{v}\times \vec{B}##
    It's essentially the same relationship, but I think you're looking at it wrong by only looking at the perpendicular part of the magnetic field.
     
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