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Electricity & Magnetism Text

  1. Jan 9, 2010 #1
    Hello there, I would like to just say before beginning that this is an excellent forum, and I have found it invaluable as a prospective physics student.

    I'm looking for an undergraduate Electricity & Magnetism text which will lead me into, and through, my Physics degree.

    Just a bit of background information as to my level of math/physics, i'm currently completing my A-Levels in Physics & Further Maths (as far as I can tell - equivalent to Calculus I/II - I have covered De Moivres Theorum etc and very simple ODE's)

    So yes, I understand that my maths is far from up-to scratch for difficult Electricity and Magnetism (and definitely) Electromagnetism modules, however I am determined and would therefore like to be directed to the best Undergraduate texts there are. If, as is likely, there is pre-requisite math skill needed, I would also be grateful if I could be directed towards a relevant text (perhaps Calculus or differential equations).

    I would also like to note which of course cheap texts would be preferable, this is an investment and I'd therefore be willing to spend the money if the text is considered to be excellent.

    Thank you very much.
     
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  3. Jan 9, 2010 #2

    nicksauce

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    Most undergraduates use Griffiths for E&M. There is a good reason for this; it is the best undergrad E&M textbook.
     
  4. Jan 9, 2010 #3
    Which edition is better? second or 3rd?
     
  5. Jan 9, 2010 #4

    nicksauce

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    I'd think it is safe to assume the 3rd edition is "better", although I haven't ever looked at the 2nd.
     
  6. Jan 9, 2010 #5
    Hmm, are you referring to "Introduction to Electrodynamics" ?

    Do you think that it would be a suitable and accessible text for me now? (Having taken roughly Calculus II)

    Thank you for the feedback.

    Another trouble I foresee is perhaps the lack of solutions to the questions set in the book, are they given to you? This would pretty much be a necessity if i'll be self-studying.
     
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2010
  7. Jan 9, 2010 #6

    nicksauce

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    Presumably not, as you need vector calculus (divergence and curl operators, line, surface and volume integration, Divergence theorem, Stokes' theorem), and also a bit of ODEs (but this is easy enough to pick up). Grifftihs' book has a short introduction to all the vector calculus you need, but it would be helpful to supplement that with another textbook. I'm not sure which I'd recommend, but you can search the forums, as I'm sure it has been asked many times.
     
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