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Electromagnetic pulse engine

  1. Jun 29, 2011 #1
    This is my first posting with the forum and I hope I have chosen the appropriate topic. I am a 25 year automotive technician and have been pursuing an alternative application for the automotive industry. It is the electromagnetic pulse engine, which basically utilizes a regular 4 cylinder engine (using the block and pistons for demonstrative purpose) minus the head. I want to attach 4 iron caps to the top of the pistons, approximately 1/16 - 1/8 inch thick but slightly smaller than the piston top itself. An aluminum platform will bolt to the block that will be raised approximately 1 inch above the block surface. The platform will have 4 cut outs to allow an electromagnet to be attached above each cylinder opening. My question is this: Does the electromagnet windings (insulated copper wire) determine the direction that the electromagnet will "push" or "pull" the modified pistons? I want to show that the electromagnet, when "fired" through the existing distributor configurations will push (preferable) or pull the piston through sequence. Any advice, opinion, and insight will be appreciated. The prototype will be ready within a month and I have politicians, environmentalists, and some people in Hollywood waiting to see the video demonstration, once I get the basic premise of a working model up and running. Thank you.
     
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  3. Jun 29, 2011 #2
    Let me see if I understand this: The piston heads will have iron caps on them and the electromagnets will attach to a platform above the cylinder (where the spark plug and valves would normally be)? Correct me if I'm wrong.

    If this is actually the case, I would think in this configuration the electromagnets would only attract the iron, not repel it. Now if the iron caps were magnetized (permanent or with a solenoid), then you could attract and repel the piston just by switching the direction of current on the electromagnets above the cylinder.
     
  4. Jun 29, 2011 #3

    russ_watters

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    Welcome to PF!

    Just out of curiosity, what are you trying to accomplish with this? Are you thinking you can use the electric power that fires the spark plugs to energize the magnets and add a little free torque to your engine?
     
  5. Jun 29, 2011 #4
    The way I read it, you want to operate a (modified) conventional piston engine using electromagnets in place of combustion.

    Even if you could fashion powerful enough electromagnets, the electrical power required will be far more than simply using a typical electric motor.
     
  6. Jun 29, 2011 #5

    Drakkith

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    Like Pantaz said I think it is much simpler, cheaper, and more efficient to just use a normal electrical motor. This sounds way overcomplicated.
     
  7. Jun 30, 2011 #6
    Basically what I am trying to accomplish is showing that the electromagnet when fired can pull (thank you) a piston, and in a proper firing order (which will have to be re-worked because the 4 stroke engine now becomes a 2 stroke engine - eliminating the compression and exhaust stroke) in turn, will drive the engine. I will utilize the existing alternator/distributor configuration to fire the electromagnet. At this time I would like to know what size electromagnet would I need to accomplish this and if the spark from the distributor carries enough output/voltage to fire the magnet. I am not worried about pulling and then pushing the piston, all I want is to push each piston in sequence to rotate the engine. I want to eliminate the obvious: gas, emissions, dependence on foreign oil, environmental disasters, etc... and present the prototype to the industry. Just one rotation is all I need, and from there I'll let the engineers expand on the rest: will there be magnetic fields that could affect the other electronic components? What about heat generated? Will additional batteries be required? can I utilize the accelerator pedal to increase voltage for increased power/speed? The obvious will be eliminated: gas tanks, and all fuel related components, exhaust manifolds, catalytic converters, timing belts, etc... And lastly, an aftermarket conversion for existing automobiles.
     
  8. Jun 30, 2011 #7
    I agree with pantaz and Drakkith, just use an electric motor. Piston engines are optimized for combustion, rotary electric motors are optimized for electric power sources. You will get far better performance using an electric motor than a piston engine converted to act like an electric motor. As your aims sound in line with what the electric car teams are trying to accomplish, such as the Chevy Volt or Nissan Leaf, I would suggest looking into their technology. By the way, one of the main hurdles in developing an electric car is not a good motor, but a good battery. It turns out that gasoline has a much higher deliverable energy density than conventional batteries, so that you have to pack the car with a ridiculous amount of batteries, or be content with not leaving the city. The important research right now for electric cars, as I see it, is in battery technology.
     
  9. Jul 1, 2011 #8

    russ_watters

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    So you want to make a crude electric motor that will drive a generator to power said electric motor? Sorry, but that's an obvious violation of conservation of energy and the rules of this forum. Electric motors require electrical energy to make them generate mechanical work. What you describe will not work.

    Thread locked.
     
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