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Electromagnetic wave equation

  1. Jun 8, 2007 #1
    First of all I have to say that translating specific words from native language to english, is not easy. So I hope that you realize what is going on:

    What did I do wrong ?

    (Traveling waves from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waves ).
     

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  3. Jun 8, 2007 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    First, E and B will have different phases. You show them with the same phase shift. Second, the magnitude of E and B are related by the characteristic impedance of free space -- do you know how?
     
  4. Jun 8, 2007 #3
    I suppose the pahases are the same. If they aren't, should I find them too ?

    I can't recall any formula for that.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2007 #4

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

  6. Jun 9, 2007 #5
    How to find B_0. THe formula B_0=E_0/c doesn't give B_0=0,5
    It gives 0,005.
     
  7. Jun 13, 2007 #6
    Thanks for no help!
    The benifit of this forum is ZERO.
    I recommend this forum to everybody who wants no help.

    No offence, physicist!
     
  8. Jun 13, 2007 #7

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Sorry you feel that way -- you are in the minority. We do not give out answers here on the PF. We try to point you to resources that you can use to help you figure out the problem.

    In your post above.... E and B are not related by c. They are related by the characteristic impedance of free space. That is how you find B from E.
     
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