Electron and linear potential

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For my current assignment we are investigating an electron incident on a linear potential. For the most part i am happy with my answers, however i am having trouble answering one question - how would one create a linear potential experimentally?

I know linear potentials exist in diodes, but i believe a vacuum would be required to investigate the incoming electron for the present problem?
 

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jtbell
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Do you mean a V(x) that is linear in x, i.e. V(x) = ax + b where a and b are constants? The space between two parallel plates that are at different potentials has a linear potential function.
 
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hi

Do you mean a V(x) that is linear in x, i.e. V(x) = ax + b where a and b are constants? The space between two parallel plates that are at different potentials has a linear potential function.
From a person that is a beginner in physics but wishes to know.
according to the theory of big bang the universe was made by
a point of energy that exploted, but isnt this going against
the law of conservation of momentum which says that there
have to be a source of matter a nucleous that will absorb
both the energy and momentum?
 
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Thanks for the reply jtbell, yes, i do mean "a V(x) that is linear in x, i.e. V(x) = ax + b where a and b are constants?"

In order to investigate quantum mechanical tunneling of this electron is it possible to have an electron emmitted from one plate to the other with the plates in a vacuum? You see, while the potential is linear between said plates, i am investigating an electron incident such that it sees the potential as V(x)=ax, not incident perpindicular to the potential.
 
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