Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Electron emitting a photon

  1. Oct 30, 2011 #1

    fluidistic

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    From my understanding, when solving the hydrogen atom (getting the wavefunction of the electron) in introductory quantum mechanics, we assume that the Hamiltonian doesn't change with time (because in this case the solution of the S. equation is separable and therefore "easy" to obtain). In other words, we assume that the system proton+electron is stable so that we dismiss any emission of the electron. It means we do not seek to explain using the Schrödinger's equation how an electron emits and do its transition of "orbit".
    I would to know if there is some mathematical model that exactly explain what happens to the electron when it get "hit by a photon" or when the atom is in excited unstable state and then emits a photon and comes back to the ground state.

    When a charge is accelerated it must emit EM waves according to classical mechanics. Is there a similar description in quantum mechanics? If so, where can I read more about this?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2011 #2
  4. Oct 30, 2011 #3

    fluidistic

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Thank you very much.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook