Electron Inertia ?

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

101 question, probably could find out by doing research but had luck on this forum on another topic, so ...

If electrons have 'negative' charge and nucleus is 'positive' what force keeps them apart ? Is it just a matter of them sort of 'orbiting' like the moon around the earth where 'falling' at same rate as G or 'centripetal' force same as G ? I got the impression that the electrons move about with some randomness which I would have thought would mean that on closer approaches to nucleus would over time cause electron to fall down to nucleus. ?? Thanks for any insight
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ZapperZ
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
Insights Author
35,646
4,421
101 question, probably could find out by doing research but had luck on this forum on another topic, so ...

If electrons have 'negative' charge and nucleus is 'positive' what force keeps them apart ? Is it just a matter of them sort of 'orbiting' like the moon around the earth where 'falling' at same rate as G or 'centripetal' force same as G ? I got the impression that the electrons move about with some randomness which I would have thought would mean that on closer approaches to nucleus would over time cause electron to fall down to nucleus. ?? Thanks for any insight
Please start by reading the FAQ thread in the General Physics forum.

Zz.
 
  • #3
Please start by reading the FAQ thread in the General Physics forum.

Zz.
Thanks, I don't know how i didn't see that, sorry
 
  • #4
757
0
101 question, probably could find out by doing research but had luck on this forum on another topic, so ...

If electrons have 'negative' charge and nucleus is 'positive' what force keeps them apart ?
Fermi pressure

Is it just a matter of them sort of 'orbiting' like the moon around the earth where 'falling' at same rate as G or 'centripetal' force same as G ? I got the impression that the electrons move about with some randomness which I would have thought would mean that on closer approaches to nucleus would over time cause electron to fall down to nucleus. ?? Thanks for any insight
No. When you are talking about particles that small, classical physics doesn't make sense. The electron doesn't "orbit" around the nucleus in the classical sense of the word.
 

Related Threads on Electron Inertia ?

  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
10
Views
13K
Replies
1
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
0
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
972
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
53K
Top