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Electron orbit distance

  1. Apr 27, 2013 #1
    Do electrons all orbit an nucleus at the same distance? I.e is an 's' cloud always the same in every atom or does the chance of finding one closer or further to the nucleus change? What about when the spin opposite electron enters the shell?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 27, 2013 #2

    mfb

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    Electrons don't "orbit" the nucleus at all.
    If the charge of the nucleus, the quantum number n and the configuration of all other electrons are the same, it is. If you change at least one thing, you get a different result.
     
  4. Apr 28, 2013 #3
    So lets say we have a hydrogen 1s1 cloud - you are saying it has a different the size volume cloud as its anion hydride 1s2?

    What if we add a neutron - is the volume still the same? (i would have guessed that its opposing spin electron would be permitted permitted in the same volume?)
     
  5. Apr 28, 2013 #4

    mfb

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    Additional electrons change the potential for the electron. The magnitude of the effect depends on the orbitals of the other electrons.
    Neutrons don't matter, if you neglect the "motion" of the nucleus.
     
  6. Apr 28, 2013 #5
    Sticking with hydrogen example - you are saying if we make it an anion (and change the pe).. this makes the orbital more voluminous?
     
  7. Apr 28, 2013 #6

    mfb

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    I don't find numbers for the size, but the binding energy gives some good hints:
    "The Negative Ion of Hydrogen" gives an energy of 14.35 eV for a double ionization. As the electron configuration is symmetric, this corresponds to an energy of ~7 eV per electron, less than the binding energy of a single electron.
     
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