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Electron Screening

  1. Nov 10, 2009 #1
    "Electron screening" came up in a homework assignment, and I'm not sure what it means exactly. All I've been able to find on the general topic is that it relates to charge (which I may very well have misunderstood). The homework question is about terms in the SWE for Li which represent screening felt by the 2s electron. Based on what I've tried to learn so far, would charge be one of them?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 10, 2009 #2
    Hi,

    Electron screening plays an important role in order to have unambigious determination of electron screening energy which is very helpful.

    Electron screening works with so many terms as it also good for photon- photon reactions.

    just go through it so that it is no difficult for you to learn more about Electron screening basics.

    Thanks!
     
  4. Nov 11, 2009 #3

    chemisttree

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    Please ignore nimmysnv. That is total BS!

    Electron screening is the effect of lower shell electrons have upon higher energy electrons. The higher energy electrons 'see' the nucleus through a fog of the lower energy electrons. They 'see' a smaller nuclear charge as a result. It is usually referred to as 'electron shielding'.
    http://dl.clackamas.cc.or.us/ch104-06/shielding_electrons.htm [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Nov 11, 2009 #4
    chemisttree,

    Thanks for the link and explanation, this is exactly what I was looking for. I'm vaguely familiar with the term shielding electrons, but I didn't make the connection. Thanks again, this is extremely helpful.
     
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