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Electrostatics Question

  1. Feb 13, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    At each corner of a square of side there are point charges of magnitude Q, nQ, mQ, and 4Q (Fig. 16-52), where n = 5 and m = 2.

    Figure 16-52 is here: http://www.webassign.net/giancoli/16-52alt.gif

    (a) Determine the force on the charge nQ due to the other three charges.
    ? N at ?° counterclockwise from the +x axis (to the right)

    (b) Determine the force on the charge mQ due to the other three charges.
    ? N at ?° counterclockwise from the +x axis (to the right
    )



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    I have no idea how to solve these questions. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 13, 2009 #2

    Redbelly98

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    What equation do you know of that relates force and charge?
     
  4. Feb 16, 2009 #3
    All I know is that the force on the charge 5Q due to the other 3 charges is:
    F5Q=FQ+F2Q+F4Q
     
  5. Feb 16, 2009 #4

    Redbelly98

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    That's a reasonable start.

    There's a well-known equation for the force between 2 charges. It is very likely the very first equation taught to you when your class began studying electricity. (And, you would not be asked a question like this if you had not been given that equation.)

    Can you look in your textbook, or review your class notes, and find the equation?
     
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