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Element 112 is - Copernicium!

  1. Sep 10, 2009 #1

    Astronuc

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    According to Webelements.com,
    http://www.webelements.com/nexus/node/1419 [Broken]

    I bet people will call it Copernicum, just like we say aluminum in the US as opposed to aluminium (UK, Australia, NZ, etc).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 11, 2009 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Why Copernicus?

    He had nothing do do with chemistry, nor (obviously! :rolleyes:) with quantum physics.

    We don't have a Newtonium.

    Copernicus has a very prominent rayed crater on the Moon named after him … let that be enough! :smile:

    (and, in English, it sounds too much like "copper", and "Cp" looks very much like "copper")
     
  4. Sep 11, 2009 #3
    The element was named after Copernicus because it is the year of astronomy.

    The nomenclature of the periodic table is nothing but arbitrary. There are elements named after planets, and even dwarf planets.
     
  5. Sep 11, 2009 #4

    Astronuc

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    Maybe they're saving Newtonium for something heavier. :biggrin:

    There's still Uut, Uuq, Uup, Uuh, Uus, Uuo to name. Maybe Newtonium can finish that series (Nt-294, or Nw?), or they could wait until the get element-122 or -124 with mass 300.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2009
  6. Sep 11, 2009 #5

    alxm

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    We could always use more elements named after Ytterby.

    Just kidding.. :)
     
  7. Sep 11, 2009 #6

    tiny-tim

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    Galileo Kepler Biot Herschel

    hmm … from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Year_of_Astronomy" [Broken]
    Seems to me Galileium and Keplerium have considerable prioirity over Copernicium. :rolleyes:

    Also, Galileo laid the foundations of mechanics, which is 50% of quantum mechanics (well, you get my drift :wink: …).

    And there are astronomers who were also important chemists …

    for example, Biot, whose chemistry is well-known, pioneered the study of meteorites … see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean-Baptiste_Biot" [Broken]

    and http://www.gordonmoyes.com/2009/01/29/2009-the-international-year-of-astronomy/" [Broken]
    (and John Herschel Glenn was the http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Herschel_Glenn" [Broken]
    … so Herschelium could be named after two astronomers and an astronaut! :smile:
    No, it isn't arbitrary … they're usually named after the place (or country) where they were discovered (eg http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ytterbium#History"), or after their nature or appearance or how they were discovered (eg Helium in the sun, Lanthanum from the Greek for "hidden"), or after the discoverer or a scientist connected with the underlying science (eg Einsteinium, Fermium, Mendeleevium).

    (oh, and Nobel paid for his! :biggrin:)
    Yes, Uranium and Cerium were named after planets which had just been discovered (and Neptunium and Plutonium were named after Uranium!) … which is reasonable since
    i] discovering a planet is a bit like discovering an element
    ii] planets are made of elements! o:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Sep 11, 2009 #7

    alxm

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    Re: Galileo Kepler Biot Herschel

    Well, one can always wonder why they're giving it to an astronomer when they've yet to honor Lavoisier, Dalton, Berzelius, etc, with elements.

    Actually he didn't :) His will gave the prize-awarding institutions the right to create "Nobel institutes", but didn't give them any money for them.

    Oh, and why do they want to give Niels Bohr an element (#107)?!
    He already had one! - Bohr is pronounced exactly the same as 'bor' (Boron) in Danish!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  9. Sep 11, 2009 #8

    tiny-tim

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    what a Bohr!

    :rofl: Bohr-ing! :biggrin:
     
  10. Sep 11, 2009 #9
    Re: Galileo Kepler Biot Herschel


    Well, alot cools things have been named after them. The Galileo space probe, Kepler space telescope (which will discover hundreds of extrasolar planets), ESA's submillimeter wave William Herschel telescope, Hubble telescope.

    There is nothing else really named after Copernicus. He is the father of astronomy, not in the sense as to how many discoveries he made, it dwarfs in comparison of Galileo's and Kepler's contributions, but they all built upon each other. Copernicus was the first to brake away from the Ptolemy's theory, and was the first person in the history to discover that earth orbits the sun. Ancient Egyptians didn't get it, Babylonians didn't get it, and neither did the ancient Greeks. The rest was history.

    Anyways, that's what happens when naming things after people. Some people will always be left out. Physics and math has no problem because they name things after the discoverer, in biology taxonomists have an elaborate system to name species. Chemistry has a nice system to name compounds, but when it comes to the elements all hell brakes loose. One might argue that Mendeleev should have came up with a naming system when he was organizing the elements, but needless to say, the names of elements are extremely diverse, each with its own history reflects science, politics, economy, and mythology, which pretty much is a snap shot of the human species.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2009
  11. Sep 11, 2009 #10

    Astronuc

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    How about tiny-timium (Tt)? :biggrin: :rofl: Goes well with neodymium or praseodymium.

    Berzelium (Bz) would be interesting.

    Would Galileium be Gm?
     
  12. Sep 14, 2009 #11

    tiny-tim

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    wiki links

    Here's some useful links …

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chemical_element_name_etymologies" [Broken]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_chemical_elements_naming_controversies" [Broken]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_elements_named_after_places" [Broken]

    :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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