Elevator free falling

  • #26
dav2008
Gold Member
609
1
The object is indeed accelerating. Think of a satellite as being in uniform circular motion with gravity accounting for the centripital force. The speed is constant but the direction is constantly changing because there is the force of gravity perpendicular to the velocity.

All this talk of elevators falling has made me afraid of them :uhh:
 
  • #27
3,042
15
The answer is because you do not 'fall' in the literal sense that you loose altitude. Your heigh above the ground remains constant, so to speak. Plus what dav just said above.
 
  • #28
Art
I always thought it was interesting that if you climbed up a ladder 300 miles high you would only weigh about 15% less than you do on earth whilst if a spacecraft in low orbit flew by you the astronauts inside would be floating around weightless.
 
  • #29
3,042
15
Those are due to two different effects
 
  • #30
Mk
2,001
3
Anyway, there is AMPLE room between the elevator and the 3 walls for air to flow up(or down) the sides, seriously mitagating compression effects.
But the speed of the elevator also counts, not just the space between the elevator and side walls.
 
  • #31
Art
cyrusabdollahi said:
Those are due to two different effects
Obviously, but I think you will find most people don't realise that. There seems to be a common misconception that the effect of gravity declines rapidly and that going 300 miles straight up into space would render you weightless.
 
  • #32
Danger
Gold Member
9,647
251
ENTER, STAGE LEFT--PF. That's what we're here for. :biggrin:
 

Related Threads on Elevator free falling

  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
1K
B
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
5K
Replies
25
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
806
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
903
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
Top