1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: Eliminate arbitrary constant

  1. Jun 26, 2010 #1
    I would like to eliminate the arbitrary constant in this equation:



    2. x^3-3x^2y=C



    3. I tried differentiating with respect to x:
    x^3-3x^2y=C
    3x^2-(3x^2+6xy)=0?

    This is where i dunno what I will do next. I dunno know what the result of differentiating C with respect to x. I assumed it is zero but I don't know if its right. Pls help me thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 26, 2010 #2

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Why? What exactly is the problem you're trying to solve? Differentiating with respect to x (which you attempted below) will get rid of the constant, but so what?
    When you differentiate -3x2y, you need to use the product rule. y is not a constant
    Since C is a constant, its derivative is zero.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook