Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: Eliminate arbitrary constant

  1. Jun 26, 2010 #1
    I would like to eliminate the arbitrary constant in this equation:



    2. x^3-3x^2y=C



    3. I tried differentiating with respect to x:
    x^3-3x^2y=C
    3x^2-(3x^2+6xy)=0?

    This is where i dunno what I will do next. I dunno know what the result of differentiating C with respect to x. I assumed it is zero but I don't know if its right. Pls help me thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 26, 2010 #2

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    Why? What exactly is the problem you're trying to solve? Differentiating with respect to x (which you attempted below) will get rid of the constant, but so what?
    When you differentiate -3x2y, you need to use the product rule. y is not a constant
    Since C is a constant, its derivative is zero.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook