Emergency Landing

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LowlyPion
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Here's an exciting landing in Alaska:
A 21-year-old pilot looking for a place to snowboard lost control of his 1941 Taylorcraft in a snow-crust landing and slid to the brink of a cliff. The plane caught on a rock just below the top, and nobody was hurt.
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/newsreader/story/771362.html [Broken]

Now how to get it down.
 
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  • #2
Moonbear
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  • #3
LowlyPion
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Down is the easy part. :biggrin:
The insurance co. might have a different view of that.

In looking at that, I thought those kinds of things only happened in the movies. Indiana Jones usually always lands that way.
 
  • #4
Moonbear
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Hey, you didn't say down in one piece. :wink: I still think that back up will be the harder part.
 
  • #5
JasonRox
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Hey, you didn't say down in one piece. :wink: I still think that back up will be the harder part.
I think it's actually easier than you think. You just need a good latch on it, and a powerful helicopter can pull it right up.
 
  • #6
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I think it's actually easier than you think. You just need a good latch on it, and a powerful helicopter can pull it right up.
It could, if it werent at a density alttidue of 10k feet. At those heights, a helicopter has one hell of a time just keeping itself in the air.
 
  • #7
DaveC426913
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Down is the easy part. :biggrin:

Moonie's right. Down is the easy part. The stop at the end, not so much.
 
  • #8
FredGarvin
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It could, if it werent at a density alttidue of 10k feet. At those heights, a helicopter has one hell of a time just keeping itself in the air.
Not all helicopters are created equal. A Chinook laughs at that load at 10k.
 
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Not all helicopters are created equal. A Chinook laughs at that load at 10k.
Wow, thats pretty damn impressive.
 
  • #10
LowlyPion
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Follow-up: The plane has been recovered:
"It was in a fairly precarious place," said Jim Acher, the Big Lake owner of Northern Pioneer Helicopters. Acher is the pilot Jake eventually contracted to retrieve the Taylorcraft. Acher sling-loaded the plane off the peak beneath a Bell UH-1 helicopter, an aircraft best known simply as a "Huey."

a delicate job

Recovering the plane from its perch, he added, was actually pretty easy, but getting it rigged for recovery was another matter.

A friend of Soplanda's climbed out on the plane to wrap climbing ropes around it to form a harness to which Acher could attach the helicopter's sling.
http://www.adn.com/news/alaska/aviation/story/776605.html [Broken]
 
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  • #11
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If this is the correct model, it weighs 1,250 pounds.
http://taylorcraft.org/docs/A-746.pdf

I would think a few snowmobiles should be able to tug it up and over if they can rig some type of a (maybe collapsible) boom or other leverage enabling device near the edge...and there's something to attach to near the tail.

BTW, how did the pilot escape?
 
  • #12
DaveC426913
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I would think a few snowmobiles should be able to tug it up and over if they can rig some type of a (maybe collapsible) boom or other leverage enabling device near the edge...and there's something to attach to near the tail.
Extremely dangerous:
- many more people on the ground (i.e. more than zero)
- things and people attached to foundering plane that might get dragged over the edge
- so what? now you have a plane on top of a cliff. Can't fly it until it's been thoroughly checked out in a repair shop anyway, so...
 
  • #13
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Moonie's right. Down is the easy part. The stop at the end, not so much.
In other words, the ground is the only hard part when you come right down to it.
 
  • #14
turbo
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Years back, a reckless float-plane pilot landed his plane on Mountain Dimmick Pond. So far, so good, but float planes need a lot of take-off room and the cliffs, bluffs, and forest surrounding the pond blocked take-off. In the end, he had to pay the landowners for permission to build a road up their mountain, pay the earth-moving company to build the road, and pay someone to disassemble the plane, lash it to a trailer and haul it down off the mountain, THEN pay to have it reassembled, inspected and re-certified. That was one pricey misjudged landing.
 
  • #15
LowlyPion
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BTW, how did the pilot escape?
Actually the account is at that link. They apparently crawled out ... very carefully.

Then I imagine they changed their knickers.
 
  • #16
DaveC426913
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Actually the account is at that link. They apparently crawled out ... very carefully.

Then I imagine they changed their knickers.
The bad news is: Bob change with Bill, Nick change with Annie...
 
  • #17
wolram
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The bad news is: Bob change with Bill, Nick change with Annie...
:rofl:
 
  • #18
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The bad news is: Bob change with Bill, Nick change with Annie...
Is that an Alaska thing?
 
  • #19
Danger
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Is that an Alaska thing?
I'm not sure about Alaskan in general, but the Inuit share everything including wives.
The solution to that landing looks pretty simple to me. Send a passenger out to push. The first few hundred feet of falling straight down should build up enough airspeed to fly out of there. :biggrin:
 
  • #20
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I'm not sure about Alaskan in general, but the Inuit share everything including wives.
The solution to that landing looks pretty simple to me. Send a passenger out to push. The first few hundred feet of falling straight down should build up enough airspeed to fly out of there. :biggrin:
Might make a good reality TV show...for stuntmen.:surprised
 
  • #21
Vanadium 50
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Any landing you can walk away from is a good landing. A great landing is when you can reuse the aircraft!
 
  • #22
DaveC426913
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I'm not sure about Alaskan in general, but the Inuit share everything including wives.
The solution to that landing looks pretty simple to me. Send a passenger out to push. The first few hundred feet of falling straight down should build up enough airspeed to fly out of there. :biggrin:
This is the one time I'll volunteer to be the one to get out and push...
 
  • #23
DaveC426913
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Full flaps, dammit! That's a tennis court!
Pilot: Full flaps dammit! That's the shortest runway I've ever seen!
Copilot: Yeah, but sure is wide...

:biggrin:
 
  • #24
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This is the one time I'll volunteer to be the one to get out and push...
I recently lost a good friend who served as a Medic in Vietnam in the early/mid 60's. He never really talked about it except for 1 story.

After a VERY heavy rain, it was VERY HOT and a large airplane got stuck in the VERY DEEP mud at the end of the runway. He, along with about 100+ of his closest buddies...some in mud up to their waists...spent a very long (did I mention HOT?) afternoon lifting, pushing, pulling (swearing, hitting and spitting) on that big bird until it could move on it's own.

When they were done, they all sat in the mud and drank HOT Budweiser (apparently they could have all the Bud they wanted...there just wasn't any way to cool it).

He was a good guy.
 
  • #25
Danger
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they all sat in the mud and drank HOT Budweiser
Bloody hell! Isn't that what they serve to their least favourites at Guantánamo Bay? :yuck:
 

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