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Endothermic Paint

  1. Sep 15, 2009 #1
    Ok so theres this paint that has been produced which contains small glass beads. When painted on to a wall it acts as insulation. Very good insulation in fact. I was listening to a radio show where a person was talking about it and he described that it was endothermic in nature. Now i know what endothermic is. In a chemical reaction energy is absorbed from the outside system. In this case something is being done, that is a reaction. How ever with the paint it is already dried. They describe the paint as being cool to the touch out in the dessert. If its endothermic, where is the energy going? Whats it doing work on?
    Cheers
    Damian
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 15, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    They almost certainly didn't mean endothermic.
    And it will only act as an insulator in that it reflects sunlight - paint is too thin to be an efficient insulator.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2009
  4. Sep 15, 2009 #3
    Thanks mgb_phys. The paint has tiny glass spheres added to it and was developed in cooperation with nasa. Heres a link
    http://www.thermilate.com.au/ [Broken]
    Yeah thats what i thought. I am sure he said endothermic though, have to relisten.
    Cheers
    Damian
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  5. Sep 16, 2009 #4
    Chrome engines look nice at car shows, but you dont see much chrome at the dragstrip. Chrome reflects heat internally resulting in a hotter running engine.

    The reverse is also true, most high performance, high compression motorcycle engines are black, aestetics is not the only reason for this. Ever notice most water cooled engine radiators are black in color?

    Solar heating devices and refridgeration equipment use color and "paint" to their advantage as well.

    Two identical metalic objects, one painted metalized silver(white may work as well, or better in some instances), the other flat black, heated in an oven. Typically, when taken out, the flat black object will lose heat more quickly. Yes there are many variables, but I have done this experiment with two quarters, taken to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2009
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