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Energy conservation violation

  1. Oct 21, 2014 #1
    Energy conservation violation

    First of all, I would like to say that this model is NOT a perpetual motion. It will stop eventually. What I want to say here is that the output useful work seems to be greater than input energy

    My system consists of 2 elements. Each element is a cylinder put on an axle. There are two permanent magnets stuck on each cylinder, with their north poles are faced outside. In the youtube clip that I will show you below, you can see the magnets of the first element are painted in blue, while those of the second one are crossed with X.

    I turn the cylinders slightly so that the north poles of the magnets are faced each other. Then, the thrust between magnets make the cylinders rotate.

    A single cylinder on an axle itself is not the system. It is an element of the system, which consists of 2 at all. Therefore, the thrust between magnets is not external force which affect system. It is comprehended as internal force between 2 elements of the system. The thrust from the first cylinder makes the second rotate, and the thrust from the second, in its turn, make the first rotate. Each component act as the cause to make the other rotate, and it acquires the affect from the other to rotate.

    While the input work of the system originates from a small force making cylinders moving short arc, and make magnets facing each other, the output dynamic energy is much higher. You can see in the clip that both cylinders rotate many circles, which create output useful work much greater than the work to make the magnets facing each other.


    Here is the link of my clip

    [Video Link Deleted by Mentor]


    Your comments are welcomed to determine that if energy conservation is violated in this case or not

    Thanks

    Thinh Nghiem from Vietnam
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 21, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 21, 2014 #2

    A.T.

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member


    How did you measure this?
     
  4. Oct 21, 2014 #3

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    That is the definition of a perpetual motion machine. We do not discuss them here.
     
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