Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Energy required for temperature raise - temperature-dependent specific heat capacity

  1. Oct 17, 2011 #1
    Any help on this quistion would be greatly appreciated. I have no idea ho to answere it, and can't find anything in my nothes or books anywhere.

    The temperature-dependent molar specific heat capacity at constant pressure of many substances is given by: c =a+2bT−cT^−2

    For magnesium, the numerical values of the constants are: a=25.7, b=3.13x10^-3, c=3.27x10^5

    where c has units J/Kxmol

    Calculate the energy required to raise the temperature of 15g of Megnesium from 30 C to 300 C.

    I have tried using the formula to qenerate a specific heat capacity for each temperature, but just seem to get crazy numbers that don't make any sense!

    Thanks for the help!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 17, 2011 #2

    NascentOxygen

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Energy required for temperature raise - temperature-dependent specific heat capac

    When S.H is a constant, c, then energy=c x delta T

    which looks like what you'd get from integral of c from T1 to T2

    So try integral of c from T1 to T2 where c is a function of T.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Similar Discussions: Energy required for temperature raise - temperature-dependent specific heat capacity
Loading...