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Energy rms of light in space

  1. Oct 30, 2012 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    "Above the atmospere the average intensity of sunlight is about 1000(W/m^2)
    1. what is the average E(rms)
    2. what would be the radiation pressure "P" exerted on a mirror there?
    3. the sun is 150 million kilometers away from this point, how long does it take light to get here?

    2. Relevant equations
    S=(epsilon-naught)(c)(E^2)
    P=[2(S)]/c
    V=x/t


    3. The attempt at a solution
    I took the equation S=(epsilon-naught)(c)(E^2); i rearranged the equation to solve for E= sqrt(S/(epsilon-naught(c))) I assumed that gave me E-max so I then divided E buy sqrt(2) to go to rms. questions 2 and 3 i think i was able to solve on my own.


    I think I have attached the homework itself in the case that I've said something that doesn't make sense
     

    Attached Files:

  2. jcsd
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