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Homework Help: Energy Work Problem

  1. Apr 9, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Joe exerts a force of 300 Newtons to move his car, which has run out of gas. How much work has he done if he moves the car 200 meters in 3.0 minutes?
    Note that the car weighs 10000 Newtons.


    2. Relevant equations

    W=F[tex]\Delta[/tex]Xcos[tex]\theta[/tex]

    W=work
    F=force
    [tex]\Delta[/tex]X=change in location
    cos [tex]\theta[/tex]= cos of angle

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I have solved similar problems by plugging in the force given but I do not know how the weight of the car plays into solving the problem. I know that there is no angle so you just do the cos of zero which is one and delta x would be 200m.
    So what my main question is, as I stated before, is how the weight of the car comes into solving the problem and also the 3 minutes?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 9, 2010 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    Using your correct definition of work, maybe they don't?
     
  4. Apr 9, 2010 #3
    Well in that case you get an answer of 60000 Joules?
     
  5. Apr 9, 2010 #4

    PhanthomJay

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    Yes!
     
  6. Apr 9, 2010 #5
    Much simpler than I made it out to be. Thank you!
     
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