Engineer and physics ,which is a right choice to me?

In summary, you may want to consider taking additional courses in physics (modern physics, EM waves, analytical mechanics, quantum mechanics, etc) in addition to your nuclear engineering courses in order to improve your skills.
  • #1
tackenguyen
3
0
hi everyone,
i am a junior nuclear engineer at A&M. After taking engineer classes, i feel engineering only focus on specific problems, and doesn't make me understand the subject clearly and deeply as Physics does. Furthermore i like theoretical works than design reactors and so on. I am not good at lab skills ,but i am strong at theory and prove things. i like course as EM ,modern physics and quantum than heat tranfer or fluid mechanic. I like working on my own theory than work in a large group of engineer. If i change my major to theoretical physics now, i will waste all my engineer classes. I can't study both NE and physics because i cost me too much money and time (at least 2.5 years). Please advice me what would i do. Do what i like or keep studying NE which i may like in future. Thank you very much.
 
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  • #2
Depends on your objective

Are you looking for high salary or a life of 'doing what you love'?

You can always minor or double major even though that takes a while to complete hte courses but hey, its cool and helpful.
 
  • #3
Physics might look all nice and dandy in theory, but once you want it to work you usually turn to engineering - because there is more to it than 'just theory'. So with this in mind, you should simply take additional courses in Physics (Modern Physics, EM Waves, Analytical Mechanics, Quantum Mechanics, etc)

Some of those courses will be cleverly hidden under Chemistry, EE, and ME classes - read the descriptions and prerequisites and take them in addition to nuclear engineering. If you still 'love to do it' - go to grad school for either Engineering Physics or something more particular (Applied Physics or even pure Physics)
 
  • #4
Pengwuino said:
Depends on your objective

Are you looking for high salary or a life of 'doing what you love'?

You can always minor or double major even though that takes a while to complete hte courses but hey, its cool and helpful.

What if being an engineer is "doing what you love"?
 
  • #5
Thanks a lot,
i will take advanced mechanic and EM in fall beside my NUEN 401,409. Once again ,salary is not a problem to me but "doing what i love" is my main thing in life. Somehow i wil work as a computer programmer and then study physics on my own.
 

Related to Engineer and physics ,which is a right choice to me?

1. What is the difference between engineering and physics?

Engineering is the application of scientific and mathematical principles to design and create practical solutions to real-world problems. Physics, on the other hand, is the study of the fundamental laws and principles that govern the natural world. While both fields involve a strong understanding of math and science, engineering focuses on applying this knowledge to solve specific problems, while physics focuses on understanding the underlying principles.

2. Which field offers better career opportunities, engineering or physics?

Both engineering and physics offer a wide range of career opportunities. Engineers often work in industries such as aerospace, automotive, and computer science, while physicists may work in research labs, academia, or government agencies. Ultimately, the best choice depends on your interests and strengths.

3. Is it possible to study both engineering and physics?

Yes, it is possible to study both engineering and physics. Many universities offer dual degree programs that allow students to earn a degree in both fields. However, this may require additional coursework and a longer time to complete, so it is important to carefully consider your goals and interests before pursuing this path.

4. What skills are important for a career in engineering or physics?

Some important skills for both engineering and physics include strong mathematical and analytical skills, problem-solving abilities, attention to detail, and critical thinking. Additionally, engineers may need to have good communication and teamwork skills, while physicists may need to have strong research and data analysis skills.

5. How can I determine if engineering or physics is the right choice for me?

The best way to determine which field is the right choice for you is to research and explore both options. Consider your interests, strengths, and career goals, and talk to professionals or students in both fields to gain a better understanding of what each entails. You may also consider taking introductory courses or participating in internships to get hands-on experience in each field.

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