Engineer becomes physicist? help me.

In summary, engineers can become physicists as the two fields have many overlapping skills and knowledge. Typically, an engineer would need a bachelor's degree in engineering, and possibly a master's or doctoral degree in a specific area of physics. The work of an engineer differs from that of a physicist as engineers focus on practical solutions while physicists study fundamental laws and develop theories. There are advantages to an engineer becoming a physicist, such as problem-solving and critical thinking skills. However, there may be challenges in adjusting to the more theoretical nature of physics and acquiring additional knowledge and skills.
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I have engineering background (aerospace), and now about to embark on master degree in physics (if I pass the qualifying test). I learn electromagnetism, quantum mechanics, etc .. etc ...myself for the last 1.5 yrs.

Is there anyone out there with the same kind of my situation before?

What is the best book on statistical physics? I found most books are hard to follow.

The best book on particle physics with lots of examples? introduction to gauge theory and qft?

:confused:
 
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Please respond to the thread in Academic and Career Guidance.
 
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Congratulations on your decision to pursue a Master's degree in physics! It's not uncommon for engineers to transition into physics, as both fields involve a strong understanding of mathematics and problem-solving skills. It's great that you have been self-studying electromagnetism and quantum mechanics for the past 1.5 years, as this will give you a solid foundation for your graduate studies.

As for resources, it's always best to consult with your professors and colleagues for recommendations on books and resources that align with your specific interests and goals in physics. However, some popular books on statistical physics include "Thermal Physics" by Charles Kittel and "Statistical Mechanics: A Set of Lectures" by Richard Feynman. For particle physics, "An Introduction to Quantum Field Theory" by Michael Peskin and Daniel Schroeder's "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics" are highly recommended.

It's also worth noting that as you progress through your graduate studies, you may find that your interests and focus may shift to a more specific subfield within physics. In this case, it's important to constantly seek out new resources and recommendations from your peers and professors to stay updated and knowledgeable in your chosen area of study.

Best of luck on your journey in physics!
 

Related to Engineer becomes physicist? help me.

1. Can an engineer become a physicist?

Yes, engineers can become physicists. The two fields have many overlapping skills and knowledge, making it a natural transition for engineers to switch to physics.

2. What qualifications does an engineer need to become a physicist?

Typically, an engineer would need at least a bachelor's degree in engineering to become a physicist. Depending on the specific area of physics they want to pursue, they may also need to obtain a master's or doctoral degree in that field.

3. How is the work of an engineer different from that of a physicist?

Engineers focus on applying scientific principles and knowledge to design and build practical solutions to real-world problems. Physicists, on the other hand, focus on studying the fundamental laws and principles of the universe and developing theories to explain them.

4. Are there any advantages to an engineer becoming a physicist?

Yes, there are advantages to an engineer becoming a physicist. Engineers are often skilled in problem-solving and critical thinking, which are both valuable skills in the field of physics. Additionally, engineers may have a practical understanding of how to apply physics concepts to real-world situations.

5. Are there any challenges for an engineer in transitioning to physics?

One challenge for engineers transitioning to physics may be adjusting to the more theoretical nature of the field. Engineers are used to solving practical problems, whereas physicists often deal with abstract concepts and mathematical models. Additionally, engineers may need to acquire additional knowledge and skills in areas such as advanced mathematics and theoretical physics.

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