Engineer becomes physicist? help me.

In summary: Good luck with your studies! In summary, many people with an engineering background are pursuing degrees in physics and self-studying topics such as electromagnetism and quantum mechanics. To learn these subjects, it is best to find good textbooks or online resources. Some recommended books for statistical mechanics include "Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Molecular Simulation" by Mark P. Allen and "Statistical Mechanics: Algorithms and Computations" by Werner Krauth. For particle physics, "Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction" by Frank Close is a good starting point, covering topics like gauge theory, groups, and Lie algebra. Overall, there are many resources available for self-studying these topics, so don't be discouraged and keep learning.
  • #1
sniffer
112
0
I have enegineering background (aerospace) and now about to embark on master degree in physics(if i can pass the qualifying test). I learn electromagnetisms, quantum mech, etc .. etc by myself.

Is there anyone out there with the same kind of situation? How do you do it?

What is the best book on statistical mechanics? I found all books on this are confusing.

How do I learn good particle physics step-by-step? introduction to gauge theory, groups, lie algebra etc? anybody crawling with the same experience?

:frown:
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Yes, there are quite a few people who have backgrounds in engineering and are now embarking on a degree in physics. The best way to learn the topics you mentioned is to find good textbooks or online courses and work through them at your own pace. For statistical mechanics, some of the books that are recommended are "Statistical Mechanics: Theory and Molecular Simulation" by Mark P. Allen and "Statistical Mechanics: Algorithms and Computations" by Werner Krauth. For particle physics, the book "Particle Physics: A Very Short Introduction" by Frank Close is a good starting point. It covers the basics such as gauge theory, groups, and Lie algebra. There are also plenty of online resources available to help you learn these topics in more detail.
 
  • #3


First of all, congratulations on pursuing a master's degree in physics! It takes a lot of dedication and hard work to switch fields and I commend you for taking on this challenge. As an engineer myself, I can understand the difficulties of transitioning from a more practical and applied field to a more theoretical and mathematical one.

I would recommend reaching out to your professors and fellow students for guidance and support. They may have valuable insights and resources to help you succeed in your courses. Additionally, try to attend seminars and workshops related to the subjects you are studying to gain a deeper understanding and to network with other physicists.

In terms of books, it's important to find ones that suit your learning style and level of understanding. I suggest asking for recommendations from your professors or searching for reviews online. It may also be helpful to join online forums or study groups dedicated to physics to discuss and exchange resources with others in a similar situation.

As for learning particle physics step-by-step, I would suggest starting with a comprehensive introductory textbook and then gradually moving on to more advanced texts. It's important to have a solid understanding of the basics before diving into topics like gauge theory and group theory. Again, don't hesitate to seek guidance from your professors or peers if you are struggling with specific concepts.

Overall, my advice would be to stay determined and motivated, seek help when needed, and continue to challenge yourself and learn as much as you can. Best of luck in your studies!
 

Related to Engineer becomes physicist? help me.

1. Can an engineer become a physicist?

Yes, it is possible for an engineer to become a physicist. While the two fields involve different approaches and skill sets, they are both rooted in mathematics and problem-solving. With the right training and education, an engineer can make the transition to a physicist.

2. What steps should an engineer take to become a physicist?

To become a physicist, an engineer will need to pursue a higher degree in physics, such as a Master's or Ph.D. program. They may also need to take additional courses in mathematics, theoretical physics, and experimental techniques. It is important to research and carefully choose the right program and school for one's specific interests and goals.

3. Are there any advantages to an engineer becoming a physicist?

There are several advantages to an engineer becoming a physicist. Engineers often have a strong foundation in mathematics and problem-solving, which are essential skills in physics. Additionally, engineers may have practical experience with experimental techniques and equipment, which can be beneficial in a physics research setting.

4. Are there any challenges that an engineer may face when transitioning to a physicist?

One challenge that an engineer may face when transitioning to a physicist is the difference in approach between the two fields. While engineering often focuses on practical applications and real-world problems, physics is more theoretical and abstract. This may require a shift in thinking and problem-solving strategies for the engineer.

5. Can an engineer still work in the engineering field after becoming a physicist?

Yes, an engineer can still work in the engineering field after becoming a physicist. While they may choose to pursue a career in physics research or academia, their engineering background can also be valuable in industries that require both engineering and physics knowledge, such as aerospace or materials science. Additionally, many skills and principles learned in engineering can still be applied in a physics career.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
15
Views
1K
Replies
16
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
26
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
60
Views
4K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
24
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
9
Views
958
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
2
Views
905
Back
Top