Engineer graduates, do they have a high chance of not getting the right career/job? (1 Viewer)

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My current situation is that I'm preparing for a 3-year electromechanical engineering technology course but also plan to transfer to undergraduate if things go well. On the other hand, if it's true that you, or I guess all college/university graduates, have a rather low chance of getting the right job they "dreamed" of after graduation, then I would be content working as a blue-collar.

This might balance out more since I'll probably have to deal with much less stress. I'm not going into this profession for the money (though it's still comforting to know about it), but strictly for the knowledge, but then I started realizing if it was all worth the stress involved coupled up with a 60 000 dollar loan to pay off. Honestly, if it weren't for the cost I would go for it regardless of job opportunities. It's just not realistic for me wasting another 4 years (7 total) for a degree that has a low chance for graduates getting the right jobs/position in a company. Is it true most of you end up getting a technician's/technologist position? The "knowledge" I want just wouldn't be worth the huge loan if I end up getting a 40K job that some other graduate could do who only spent 2 or 3 years in a college.

Reality... sucks? bad? or got lucky (DARPA? :eek:)? What are your cases, fellow engineers?
 
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Re: Engineer graduates, do they have a high chance of not getting the right career/jo

No one gets their "dream job" straight out of college. In some sense, the first few years of a new engineer's career are an apprenticeship in which they learn how to be an engineer and how to apply what they learned in school.

It's been a while since I entered the job market, so I can't really say anything about pay rates for new engineers. I can say that while you might start out with a "a technician's/technologist position", you won't stay there the way someone with only 2 or 3 years of college would.
 
Re: Engineer graduates, do they have a high chance of not getting the right career/jo

What is your dream job?
 
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Re: Engineer graduates, do they have a high chance of not getting the right career/jo

I see a vision working along side scientists and other engineers developing technology (it doesn't matter what kind, as long as it's something new -- or an older technology that needs to get upgraded). Whether inside a building like a giant hangar or a small testing facility, or outside in the fields testing equipment, troubleshooting, modifying, and re-designing. It has to be technology that would help out a lot of people. One example would be having that nice warm feeling everytime I think about work if I ended up becoming a good EE and got to work with people with the objective of designing an even more powerful brain scanner so doctors can detect once before undetectable brain "disorders". Do you think I've got a false motive going for me?

And I am pretty ignorant about the reality of our working world. I'm really not sure what to expect out there.
 
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Re: Engineer graduates, do they have a high chance of not getting the right career/jo

Raizy, I think that it is important to realize you can still have a very fulfilling and satisfying job even if it isn't at one of the places you dream about now. I'm sure by the time you graduate your "dream job" list will have changed somewhat anyways.

Also there isn't a dichotomy between having your dream job being a blue collar work there is plenty of middle ground, I wouldn't stress over it too much ;)
 
Re: Engineer graduates, do they have a high chance of not getting the right career/jo

Hi Raizy,

That is a very good question. Most engineers that have dream jobs have 5-15 years behind them.

If you can expect to get out of school and work in an environment where you can learn with
more senior engineers, get on the job training as well as formal training and grow through your
own curiosity, interest and hard work you too can aspire to a dream job. It's about making the
right choices in your career but also being in a place with plenty of projects and good mentors.

I believe that engineering offers some of the best options for "dream jobs" so if you like it go
for it. Then, as in any other profession you will have to develop skills, knowledge and experience
before you call the shots. Don't expect a dream job straight out of school, just find a place where
there are plenty of smarter and more experienced people and you will grow to where you can
then apply for the dream job.

Good luck,
Michael Brit
 
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