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Engineering and Applied Physics

  1. Mar 13, 2013 #1
    Hi everyone, i was asking myself , can engineers be considered applied physicist ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 13, 2013 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Is there a reason why this would matter in the least bit?

    Zz.
     
  4. Mar 13, 2013 #3
    Probably for employment opportunities?
     
  5. Mar 13, 2013 #4
  6. Mar 13, 2013 #5
    Based on your other thread you seem to have an obsession with the label of "physicist." Why?
     
  7. Mar 13, 2013 #6

    ZapperZ

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    Again, how would this matter for employment opportunities? Why would this matter whether an engineer is an "applied physicist" or not? Does it make a hoot of a difference if I call a medical doctor an "applied biologist"?

    Zz.
     
  8. Mar 13, 2013 #7
    The fact is that i've ever dreamed from the high school of being a physicist, but for an economical reason, i studied (and still studying) engineering because close to my house the closest thing to physics was computer engineering, i don't dislike of being an engineer, but i wonder anyway, if i study hard physics and study even things that when don't study at university (like quantum physics or relativity) if i ever can be considered a physicist and "Have the HONOR" to say whan i'm talking to others, i'm an applied physicist...
     
  9. Mar 13, 2013 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Then you need to examine yourself here, because it appears that you care more about "title" than anything else. This is vanity.

    Zz.
     
  10. Mar 14, 2013 #9
    I don't think it's vanity, it's just a fact of Honor of being one!

    For example if one's think of being a knight... and nobody consider him a knight because he doesn't have that title effectively, it's different of being considered a knight and I don't think it's a pity to desire a title! For me it would be an HONOR to be considered a physicist.... Understand what I mean ?
     
  11. Mar 14, 2013 #10
    That's exactly what vanity is. It's the title that attracts you. This thread has kinda gone of topic though.
     
  12. Mar 14, 2013 #11
    so i'm vanitous if my desire is to become a physicist but i'm studying engineering according to my economical possibilities ?
     
  13. Mar 14, 2013 #12
    It depends on the reason. You only want to be called a physicist for the honor. If you want to be called a physicist study physics. Zapper Z has a thread on going to physics grad school without a degree in physics.
     
  14. Mar 14, 2013 #13

    ZapperZ

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    This is silly, because somehow you have this inferiority complex at being called an engineer! What is wrong being called for what you are? There are many physicists who work in industries and proudly carry the title of engineers, even if they were trained as physicistsand have degrees in physics!

    There is no such "title" as "applied physicist".

    This thread doesn't deserve to be in "Career Guidance", because this is not a rational career guidance discussion topic.

    Zz.
     
  15. Mar 15, 2013 #14
    Wait wait wait... maybe you intended completely different things... My question was not for a vanity purpose... Let me explain... First off...I'm sorry if I offended someone with my posts, it really was not my attempt, and I'm sorry if I let somebody think that I'm vanitous, I'm not that kind of guy, i just wanted to know, if i could have the title of "applied physicist" even being an engineer, for a job purpose, and i even said that it would be anyway an honor to have such title... that's all! i perfectly know that a title is surely not a description of a person, for example, one can have the title of "engineer"/"physicist"/"mathematician" without knowing anything of any scientific subject, while there are other persons who don't have any degree but they kick a** in a lot of subjects... I repeat, I'm so sorry I gave this imagine of myself, and I assure you that I'm not that kind of person... I'm an huble engineering-student and anyway you are right now we are going out of subject... So I Think we can close this post... hoping you can accept my apologies
     
  16. Mar 16, 2013 #15

    Astronuc

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    One could look into computational physics. I would recommend taking some physics courses as part of one's engineering program.
     
  17. Mar 17, 2013 #16
    Yeah, that's what I was thinking about, i was even really interested into computational physics... thanks!
     
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