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Engineering Physics vs. Physics

  1. Nov 14, 2008 #1
    I am planning on attending university next year (in canada), and am definetly inclined to physics. I am aware of the marketability of having an engineering degree, so i was thinking of eng phys. so i have a few questions:

    1. should I be thinking about my interests or how i am going to make a living? i am interested in modern theoretical/particle/experimental physics but feel like i will be missing out on learning some of the things i am most interested in when taking my BEng. am i settling?

    2. I have never been great with CAD, and i took woodworking a couple of times but didnt think it was anything crazy. from this i can deduce that traditional engineering would not be for me, but how much does design apply to something tied closely to physics like eng phys?

    3. If i do decide to study physics, would it be in my best interest to double major in math and physics if i wanted to keep my options open in the multifaceted field of physics? i am most interested in particle/nuclear physics

    thanks for the time!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 14, 2008 #2
    Not saying that you should choose engineering; however, i would suggest reading up a bit more on what engineers actually do. Once you have a clear idea of what an engineer does ( and there are myriad possiblities) you can make a more informed decision.

    As for a dual math/physics major, I would say it depends on your particular goals. Some people do these in 4 years some in 5 so you are going to have to weigh your options. A dual major would obviously be beneficial; however it may prolong school and depending on what you are doing after undergrad it may be irrelavant.

    hope this helps, I'm only a student as well so i may not be the most knowledgable on the subject.
     
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