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Engineering Physics

  1. Dec 1, 2005 #1
    Hi,

    Does anyone know anything about career prospects and what-not in engineering physics? I've heard that it's the hardest engineering, and that Engineering Physicists are "highly trained problem solvers." I'm considering it as a professions. Anyone know anything about it?

    Thanks.
     
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  3. Dec 2, 2005 #2

    Pyrrhus

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    Well, Tom Mattson is a Physics Engineer. Maybe you can try PMing him about the career.
     
  4. Dec 4, 2005 #3
    I'm in the process of applying for this at the University of Alberta.
    I'd love to hear more about it!
     
  5. Dec 4, 2005 #4

    dlgoff

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    Well, I got a BS in engineering physics. The physics courses were the same in the school of engineering as in the liberal arts program. The only difference was basic engineering courses (strength of materials, fluid mechanics, ect.) were substituted for foreign language and some humanity courses. I used my electives taking electronic engineering courses.

    I've never seen a job posting specifically wanting an Engineering Physicists.

    Regards
     
  6. Dec 4, 2005 #5
    I am also curious about this major. What are some benefits of engineering physics as opposed to majoring in a typical engineering field like mechanical?
     
  7. Dec 4, 2005 #6

    dlgoff

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    If you want to be a mechanical engineer, you should probably stick with that curriculum. With the engineering physic degree, you would probably have fewer advanced cources in the mechanical subjects. At least that's what I think. But that's not to say you can't take extra courses.

    Regards
     
  8. Dec 7, 2005 #7
    Yes, but what are the benefits of being an engineering physicist, or are there none? Like Ztalin said, it is the hardest type of engineering, but what makes it the hardest? What types of jobs would I have? Basically, I would like to know more about this major.
     
  9. Dec 8, 2005 #8

    dlgoff

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    Like I said, I've never seen a job posting specifically wanting an Engineering Physicists, but from the physics courses with that degree, one should have a good feel of whats involved in most engineering disciplines. Albeit, you might not know all the lingo for these diciplines.

    Regards
     
  10. Dec 8, 2005 #9
    Engineering Science at PSU is awesome because it will get you into good grad schools in any engineering area.
     
  11. Dec 16, 2005 #10
    I'm also applying this year for the U of A. Hope to see you there... they only accept about 25 people, heh.
     
  12. Dec 16, 2005 #11

    Stingray

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    I've never heard anyone call themselves an engineering physicist, despite the major with that name. I imagine that some of it is what's more often called "applied physics" (semiconductor work for example). But more generally, it should give you better foundations from which to learn almost any type of engineering you end up working in.

    No undergraduate engineering curriculum will train you well enough to immediately start doing interesting work in the real world. That degree is there to show your employer that you have some baseline from which they can teach you what you need to know. Engineering physics will likely give you even less specifics than a more traditional engineering curriculum, while improving the fundamentals. This is probably a good thing for most people in the long run. Given most the engineering students I've taught (at PSU coincidentally), I think a better understanding and emphasis on physics would make their engineering courses much easier.
     
  13. Dec 16, 2005 #12

    D H

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    My (rather dusty) degree is in applied and engineering physics. Its been a good background for all my jobs, which have ranged from weather satellite ground station developer, systems engineer, artificial intelligence researcher, and aerospace engineer. About the only thing I haven't really done with my degree is physics.
     
  14. Dec 16, 2005 #13
    Yeah, I'm going into engineering physics because it's excellent to have for grad school, not because I want to be an actual engineering physicist.
     
  15. Dec 16, 2005 #14

    dlgoff

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    This is how it's worked for me also. :smile: Most of my jobs have been in different areas of electronics applied to different industries; avionics, biomedical, pharmaceutical, power industry, instrumentation.
     
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