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Entrepreneur Thread

  1. Dec 6, 2008 #1

    Astronuc

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    A former classmate of mine had a senior management position with one of the Fortune 100 companies, but he left it for a small startup company.

    I thought it appropriate to start a thread on Entrepreneurship.

    http://www.econlib.org/library/Enc/Entrepreneurship.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrepreneurship

    http://www.entrepreneurship.gov/

    http://www.kauffman.org/

    http://entrepreneurship.mit.edu/


    Which brings me to - IdeaLab.
    http://www.idealab.com/about_idealab/
    Additional startup support comes from other companies and institutions like Google or VC companies.


    Small companies and entrepreneurs drive the economy.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 30, 2011 #2

    Astronuc

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    This thread kind of went nowhere fast.

    Since the OP more than two years ago, the economy went into a tailspin.

    Anyway, for those interested in owning or participating in a small business, or thoughts of growing a small business, this might be of interest -

    Tough Options for Family Business in a Tailspin
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/13/business/smallbusinessemail/13sbiz.html

    See also - Matthew Stewart's “The Management Myth”.

    And see - Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action
    http://www.ted.com/talks/simon_sinek_how_great_leaders_inspire_action.html
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2011
  4. Jan 30, 2011 #3

    chiro

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    One good thing about entrepreneurship is that entrepreneurs take a very active role in becoming employed. When you work for someone and it hits the fan, you can be easily be laid off, but if you have a successful business, you have the skills to redirect your business in a given direction to bring new opportunities and revenue in.

    The responsibility is of course a hell of a lot higher, but in any economy the entrepreneur if successful for a decent amount of time, will be far more experienced to find opportunities to get out of a bad situation and into a new one than any employee.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 19, 2012
  5. Jan 31, 2011 #4
    I've been associated with dozens of small business ventures, many of them start-ups, since 1980. To me, the difference between 2011 and 1981 is I didn't know how bad things were in 1981 - and really didn't care. I was young, (considered myself) capitalized:rofl:, and fearless. Now, I'm sitting on the sidelines waiting for something (not sure what?) to happen.

    My advice to any one with a great idea - find an investor that agrees and also has enough capital to fund every level of your business plan. If you find that investor - and your business plan is solid - you can give up 80% of your deal and never worry about money again.
     
  6. Feb 1, 2011 #5

    Astronuc

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    That's one way - but look at what happened to Len Bosack and Sandy Lerner, founders of Cisco.

    I'd like to focus on successes more than failures, although understanding why companies failed is helpful if folks learn to avoid the same mistakes.
     
  7. Feb 8, 2011 #6
    Starting a business is always risky - even under the most favorable conditions. The three required basic components are usually capital, management, and concept. Each of these components are then further described by the type of business, Government regulations, competitive forces, and other market factors.

    In the US the playing field is considered level for most industries - there are exceptions. If establishing a business outside of the US, it is usually wise to seek local expertise.

    After observing the unrest in Egypt and elsewhere lately - I have to wonder how someone makes a decision to start a business in the midst of so much uncertainty?
     
  8. Sep 19, 2012 #7

    Astronuc

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    Christine Outram
    creative director | re:imagine group
    founder | city innovation group

    http://christineoutramadvance.weebly.com/christine-outram.html

    Christine Outram (Advanced Manufacturing) relocated to America to complete her second masters degree, while working as a research associate at MIT. In the US, Christine led the project ‘The Copenhagen Wheel’ - the creation of a wheel that turns ordinary bikes into electric hybrids with regeneration and real-time environmental sensing capabilities. She presented this project at the UN Climate Conference and has won a number of awards including: the Internet of Things 'Top 100 Thinkers' 2012, the 2010 James Dyson Industrial Design Award and the 2010 World Technology Award.

    :cool:
     
  9. Jun 2, 2013 #8

    Astronuc

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    Sir Richard Branson On Entrepreneurship
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  10. Jul 8, 2013 #9

    Astronuc

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    Chobani Yogurt -

     
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