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I Entropy vs. enthalpy in chemical reactions.

  1. Mar 9, 2016 #1
    Hello,
    I am learning about using Free energy change /delta G to determine if a chemical reaction will occur spontaneously. /delta G = /delta H + T*/delta S. Now, enthalpy change can drive a reaction which leads to a decrease in entropy (multiple reactants => single product). My Question: can the entropy component /delta S drive a reaction to occur where the outcome is of higher energy? Do such reactions exist and are the products stable?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 9, 2016 #2

    BvU

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    Hello sghan, :welcome: (there is no 'welcome back' sign yet :smile: )

    You are also rlearning about ##\LaTeX## I suppose.

    In PF enclose source with ##\#\# ## for in-line ##\TeX## and ##\$\$## for diplsayed equations (bigger, centered) and use a backslash, not a forward slash:

    ##\#\# ## \Delta G = \Delta H + T \Delta S ##\#\# ## gives ## \Delta G = \Delta H - T \Delta S ## (Note the minus sign)

    For examples, google "endothermic spontaneous reactions examples"

    Dissolving kitchen salt in water appears to be one example...
     
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