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B Equilibrium - Scalar or Vector?

  1. Sep 23, 2018 #1
    1 Is Equilibrium a Scalar or Vector quantity?
    2 What is the unit of Equilibrium?

    Thanks & Regards,
    Prashant S Akerkar
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 23, 2018 #2

    Drakkith

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    Equilibrium isn't a quantity, it's the state of a system such that the system no longer changes. As such it is neither a vector nor a scalar and the concept of units do not apply to it.
     
  4. Sep 23, 2018 #3
    Thanks.

    I mean Equilibrium cannot be measured similar to a Force applied?

    Can we have Equilibrium laws similar to Newton's laws of motion?

    Thanks & Regards,
    Prashant S Akerkar
     
  5. Sep 23, 2018 #4

    Drakkith

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    No.

    You can have rules which tell you what quantities you need for a system to reach equilibrium, if that's what you are asking.
     
  6. Sep 23, 2018 #5
    Thanks.

    Yes. I mean Similar to Newton's three laws of motion or law of conservation of momentum or law of conservation of energy or law of inertia can we derive laws of Equilibrium?

    Thanks & Regards,
    Prashant S Akerkar
     
  7. Sep 23, 2018 #6

    anorlunda

    Staff: Mentor

    Are you working on a science fiction story?

    Equilibrium is not a law or laws. If you read more of that Wikipedia article, you will see the kinds of things needed to make equilibrium.
     
  8. Sep 23, 2018 #7
  9. Sep 23, 2018 #8

    Drakkith

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    While you can find the equilibrium for a particular system, there are no fundamental 'equilibrium laws' like there are with Newton's laws of motion and other laws in physics. Remember that equilibrium is just one particular state of a system. There are potentially an infinite number of states and you could easily ask if we can derive 'laws' for these states as well.

    One interesting point of view is that the laws you are asking about are simply the fundamental physical laws that already govern everything, such as Newton's laws.
     
  10. Sep 24, 2018 #9

    jbriggs444

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    I do not think that counting out numbered laws is a productive way to approach physics. However, in this case you might consider the three laws of thermodynamics. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laws_of_thermodynamics.
     
  11. Sep 24, 2018 #10
    Thank you.

    Maybe Three laws of Equilibrium according to states ?

    Thanks & Regards,
    Prashant S Akerkar
     
  12. Sep 24, 2018 #11

    anorlunda

    Staff: Mentor

    That is analogous to a ball sitting at the bottom of a valley, at the top of a hill, or on a flat surface. There are no special laws or equations for that. Stability is a property of an equation.
     
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