Euler's Method

  • Thread starter jegues
  • Start date
  • #1
jegues
1,097
3

Homework Statement



See figure attached for problem statement.

attachment.php?attachmentid=31320&stc=1&d=1295039677.jpg


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



Here's as far as I got,

attachment.php?attachmentid=31321&stc=1&d=1295039745.jpg


The part that confuses me is the range we should solve this equation. It says,

[tex]\text{from } t=0 \text{ to } 1d[/tex]

I put the [tex]^{-1}[/tex] in there with pencil because I thought it was a typo. Is it?

If I can figure out where to stop I really just have to keep repeating the formula,

[tex]y_{n} = y_{n-1} + \Delta t F(x_{n-1}, y_{n-1})[/tex]

Right?

Thanks again!
 

Attachments

  • Q1.6.JPG
    Q1.6.JPG
    62.1 KB · Views: 499
  • A1.6.jpg
    A1.6.jpg
    34.1 KB · Views: 479

Answers and Replies

  • #2
jegues
1,097
3
Bump, still looking for some help.
 
  • #3
Redbelly98
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
12,143
165
[tex]\text{from } t=0 \text{ to } 1d[/tex]

I put the [tex]^{-1}[/tex] in there with pencil because I thought it was a typo. Is it?
No, t is time and it's units are days or d, not d-1.

If I can figure out where to stop I really just have to keep repeating the formula,

[tex]y_{n} = y_{n-1} + \Delta t F(x_{n-1}, y_{n-1})[/tex]

Right?

Thanks again!
Yes, that is the correct approach. You stop once you have reached t = 1 day.
 
  • #4
jegues
1,097
3
No, t is time and it's units are days or d, not d-1.


Yes, that is the correct approach. You stop once you have reached t = 1 day.

But how will I reach 1 day?

I have,

[tex]10-k[/tex] where k has units [tex]day^{-1}[/tex].

Can you explain please?
 
  • #5
Redbelly98
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
12,143
165
Well, if you're going to be careful about the units -- and it's a good thing if you are -- then you need to include the units correctly on all quantities. Note that Δt should really be 0.1d, not simply 0.1 as stated in the problem statement.

So you really have

y1 = y0 - k·y0·Δt
. . .= 10 Bq/L - (0.2 d-1)*(10 Bq/L)*(0.1 d)
. . .= 10 Bq/L - 0.2 Bq/L = 9.8 Bq/L

That is y1, so that is the concentration at 1·Δt or 0.1 days.
When you calculate yn, you will have the concentration after n·Δt or n·0.1 days.
 

Suggested for: Euler's Method

  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
443
Replies
3
Views
304
Replies
1
Views
740
Replies
5
Views
380
Replies
5
Views
385
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
595
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
477
Replies
7
Views
925
Replies
1
Views
303
Replies
6
Views
505
Top