Exon-intron junction sequences

In summary, the conversation is about the junction sequences in genes, specifically the exon-intron junction sequences. The speaker wonders if all genes have the same junction sequences and is interested in finding a way to identify these sequences. They are referred to JuncDB as a helpful tool for this purpose.
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I wonder do the genes have the same exon-intron junction sequences or do they have different junction sequences? I was told that all genes have this general junction sequences of the exon-intron-exon:

5'---exon---A/CG-><-GUPuAGU----intron-----Py12NPyAG-><-G---exon---3'
The arrows indicate the borders/junctions of exons and intron. When this intron is cut out and the exons are united we would have this exon-exon sequence:

5'---exon---A/CG-><-G---exon---3'.



How can i check which sequences are exon-intron junctions and which are not?



Thanks.
 
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Related to Exon-intron junction sequences

1. What are exon-intron junction sequences?

Exon-intron junction sequences are specific regions of DNA found in eukaryotic organisms where exons (coding regions) and introns (non-coding regions) meet.

2. Why are exon-intron junction sequences important?

These sequences play a crucial role in the process of gene expression, as they contain signals that determine where and how a gene is spliced (cut and rearranged) to produce the final mRNA transcript.

3. How are exon-intron junction sequences identified?

Exon-intron junction sequences can be identified through various bioinformatics tools and techniques, such as RNA sequencing and comparative genomics analysis.

4. What is the significance of alternative splicing at exon-intron junction sequences?

Alternative splicing, where different exons are selected or excluded from the final mRNA transcript, can lead to the production of multiple protein isoforms from a single gene, increasing the diversity of proteins in an organism.

5. Are exon-intron junction sequences conserved among different species?

While some exon-intron junction sequences are highly conserved among different species, others may vary, reflecting the evolutionary history of a gene and potential functional differences in gene expression among species.

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