Explain to me how sundogs form?

In summary, sundogs are optical atmospheric phenomena that appear as bright spots on either side of the sun. They form when sunlight is refracted through ice crystals in the atmosphere, usually in cirrus clouds. Sundogs can be seen when the sun is low on the horizon, typically during sunrise or sunset, and are more common in colder regions. They are not dangerous, but can be an indicator of incoming weather changes. Sundogs can be seen from anywhere on Earth, but are more commonly seen in polar regions due to the lower position of the sun.
  • #1
jnimagine
178
0
can someone explain to me how sundogs form?
I know it has to do with refraction of light through ice crystals but i need a good ray diagram explaining this...
 
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  • #2
Just Google the term and you'll find all the information you need.
 

1. What are sundogs?

Sundogs, also known as parhelia, are optical atmospheric phenomena that appear as bright spots on either side of the sun. They are also referred to as mock suns or sun halos.

2. How do sundogs form?

Sundogs form when sunlight is refracted through ice crystals in the atmosphere, usually in cirrus clouds. The ice crystals act like prisms, bending the light and creating the appearance of a bright spot or halo around the sun.

3. When can sundogs be seen?

Sundogs can be seen when the sun is low on the horizon, usually during sunrise or sunset. They are more commonly seen in colder regions, where cirrus clouds and ice crystals are more prevalent.

4. Are sundogs dangerous?

No, sundogs are not dangerous. They are purely an optical phenomenon and do not have any physical effects on the environment. However, they may be an indicator of incoming weather changes, such as a storm front.

5. Can sundogs be seen from anywhere on Earth?

Yes, sundogs can be seen from anywhere on Earth, as long as the necessary atmospheric conditions are present. However, they are more commonly seen in polar regions, where the sun is lower on the horizon for longer periods of time.

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