Explaining the High Melting Point of Water

In summary, the main reason for the high melting point of water compared to other group 4 hydrides is due to its intermolecular forces, specifically hydrogen bonding. While water is not a group 4 hydride, it is a group 6 hydride. In order to melt something, intermolecular bonds need to be broken. By looking at the given options, it can be concluded that hydrogen bonding is the main factor contributing to water's high melting point. Further information can be found in a chemistry textbook under the section of intermolecular attractions.
  • #1
andyman20
4
0
Hi..
I've finished this topic but I was confused in this question.

The question is :

The main reason for the high melting point of water compared to other group4 hydrides can be explained by:

a.Ionic Bonding
b.Covalent Bonding
c.Dispersion Forces
d.Hydrogen Bonding

I'm not sure which it is.

Thank you...
 
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  • #2
First of all, water is not a group 4 hydride - it is a group 6 hydride.

Ask yourself what kind of bonds (inter- or intra-molecular ?) you need to break in order to melt something.

What do you mean by "I've finished this topic" ?
 
  • #3
yeah..

i know that its one of the intermolecular forces but i can't figure which one it is. How do you figure that out??
THANKS
 
  • #4
Which of those forces are intermolecular and which ones are intramolecular ?
 
  • #5
Read up in your chemistry text, on the section intermolecular attractions, it should have a whole section devoted to water specifically...yes it's easy as that
 

1. Why does water have a high melting point compared to other substances?

Water has a high melting point due to its unique molecular structure. The two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom in a water molecule are held together by covalent bonds, which are very strong. Additionally, water molecules are able to form hydrogen bonds with each other, which further strengthens the overall structure and increases the melting point.

2. Does the high melting point of water have any practical applications?

Yes, the high melting point of water is essential for many biological processes. It allows water to exist in a liquid state at room temperature, which is crucial for sustaining life. The high melting point also helps regulate Earth's climate by acting as a temperature buffer, preventing extreme temperature fluctuations.

3. Are there any factors that can affect the melting point of water?

Yes, the melting point of water can be influenced by external factors such as pressure and impurities. At higher pressures, water molecules are more tightly packed and require more energy to break apart, resulting in a higher melting point. Impurities in water can also disrupt the hydrogen bonding between molecules, causing the melting point to decrease.

4. How does the melting point of water change with altitude?

The melting point of water decreases with increasing altitude. This is because as altitude increases, air pressure decreases, causing the boiling point of water to also decrease. This means that at higher altitudes, water boils at lower temperatures, and therefore has a lower melting point.

5. Can the melting point of water be altered by changing the temperature?

Yes, the melting point of water can be changed by altering the temperature. As temperature increases, the kinetic energy of water molecules also increases, causing them to vibrate more and weaken the hydrogen bonds. This results in a lower melting point. However, even at high temperatures, water's melting point remains relatively high compared to other substances due to its strong intermolecular forces.

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