Exploring Career Paths with a MSc in Biomaterials and Biomechanics

In summary: It is always helpful to have the full story. Did you not see a way of using your second MS as augmenting your previous educational experiences and if not why not?
  • #1
Cristina B
5
1
I graduated Bioengineering BSc and I am currently a MSc student in the field of Biomaterials and Biomechanics. Next year I will finish this master and I am interested in searching for job. I do not know what kind of job can I apply for with my master degree.
I would like to search and prepare me in advance. Would you mind guiding me?
 
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  • #2
Obviously for research jobs - a PhD won't hurt.

Otherwise, manufacturers of:
- endoprotheses (artificial heart valves, joints, pacers, etc.)
- protheses (e.g. Otto Bock, the almost-monopolist over here in Europe)
- medical material (e.g. Kimberly Clark, B. Braun,...)
- startups in the field - those might be the most amenable to uninvited applications, but beware the "fake-it-til-you-make-its" (Elizabeth Holmes' Theranos anyone?)
- pharma - not big pharma, probably. But i can _imagine_ that extended release systems might be a soon-to-be-sexy thing.

Also, get to know people from the second year of your master programme, and observe where they're going. Then keep contact! Networking is darn important. We have an only badly translatable aphorism in German: "Eine Fürsprache ist besser als drei Fremdsprachen" - meaning: One person vouching for you is better than knowing three foreign languages.
 
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  • #3
Godot_ said:
Obviously for research jobs - a PhD won't hurt.

Seeing that Godot has preempted me I still will retain my initial response below with the added comment, will a Ph.D. not only extend the issue of not knowing where to get a job?

I do not wish to seem impertinent but how could you have progressed so far in your education without some idea of what you want to or could do when your finish? What were you thinking about when you began? Surely you must have asked yourself where will my education take me. Certainly your course work offers some direction.

Having said all that the medical industry comes to mind as well as robotics.
 
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  • #4
gleem said:
Seeing that Godot has preempted me I still will retain my initial response below with the added comment, will a Ph.D. not only extend the issue of not knowing where to get a job?

I do not wish to seem impertinent but how could you have progressed so far in your education without some idea of what you want to or could do when your finish? What were you thinking about when you began? Surely you must have asked yourself where will my education take me. Certainly your course work offers some direction.

Having said all that the medical industry comes to mind as well as robotics.
Thank you for answering me. But you do not know my story and why I chose to remain in Vienna. This is my second master's degree and for personal and familial problems I decided to accept the proposal of this university. My initial choice would be in London with a degree that I felt more attracted and I would know better about my opportunities for jobs. But not everyone is as lucky as you are. I asked something about jobs and I am trying to do the very best that I can with all my conditions.
 
  • #5
Godot_ said:
Obviously for research jobs - a PhD won't hurt.

Otherwise, manufacturers of:
- endoprotheses (artificial heart valves, joints, pacers, etc.)
- protheses (e.g. Otto Bock, the almost-monopolist over here in Europe)
- medical material (e.g. Kimberly Clark, B. Braun,...)
- startups in the field - those might be the most amenable to uninvited applications, but beware the "fake-it-til-you-make-its" (Elizabeth Holmes' Theranos anyone?)
- pharma - not big pharma, probably. But i can _imagine_ that extended release systems might be a soon-to-be-sexy thing.

Also, get to know people from the second year of your master programme, and observe where they're going. Then keep contact! Networking is darn important. We have an only badly translatable aphorism in German: "Eine Fürsprache ist besser als drei Fremdsprachen" - meaning: One person vouching for you is better than knowing three foreign languages.
Thank you for answering me! I appreciate your recommendations. I will explore them.
 
  • #6
Cristina B said:
Thank you for answering me. But you do not know my story and why I chose to remain in Vienna. This is my second master's degree and for personal and familial problems I decided to accept the proposal of this university. My initial choice would be in London with a degree that I felt more attracted and I would know better about my opportunities for jobs. But not everyone is as lucky as you are. I asked something about jobs and I am trying to do the very best that I can with all my conditions.

It is always helpful to have the full story. Did you not see a way of using your second MS as augmenting your previous educational experiences and if not why not?

Now I must ask what was your first MS? You must have had something in mind after that, didn't you?
 
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  • #7
gleem said:
It is always helpful to have the full story. Did you not see a way of using your second MS as augmenting your previous educational experiences and if not why not?

Now I must ask what was your first MS? You must have had something in mind after that, didn't you?
First Master's Degree was in Biomaterials and Biotechnologies and wanted to work in the field of Tissue Engineering. Thus, I applied for master in London for this field. But due to some problems I was forced to remain with my mother here and accept the offer here. I do not feel okay to explain my reasons. I asked only so that I can observe if there is another perspective. Not being judged. Thank you for answering.
 
  • #8
One thing I can suggest is that you go online and look at job advertising websites like Indeed.com (which seems to be only for US companies but I am sure there are websites dedicated to European jobs ) for biomaterials or bioengineering openings and look at the job description and more importantly the job requirements to see how well you will fit. But this should give you and idea of how well prepared you are for this line of work. Indeed.com shows for biomaterials there are currently 85 job openings in the US for entry-level MS applicants. I see that some jobs require lab experience of some sort.
 
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  • #9
gleem said:
One thing I can suggest is that you go online and look at job advertising websites like Indeed.com (which seems to be only for US companies but I am sure there are websites dedicated to European jobs ) for biomaterials or bioengineering openings and look at the job description and more importantly the job requirements to see how well you will fit. But this should give you and idea of how well prepared you are for this line of work. Indeed.com shows for biomaterials there are currently 85 job openings in the US for entry-level MS applicants. I see that some jobs require lab experience of some sort.
Thank you for your help and taking your time for explaining me.
 
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  • #10
Godot_ said:
Obviously for research jobs - a PhD won't hurt.

Otherwise, manufacturers of:
- endoprotheses (artificial heart valves, joints, pacers, etc.)
- protheses (e.g. Otto Bock, the almost-monopolist over here in Europe)
- medical material (e.g. Kimberly Clark, B. Braun,...)
- startups in the field - those might be the most amenable to uninvited applications, but beware the "fake-it-til-you-make-its" (Elizabeth Holmes' Theranos anyone?)
- pharma - not big pharma, probably. But i can _imagine_ that extended release systems might be a soon-to-be-sexy thing.

Also, get to know people from the second year of your master programme, and observe where they're going. Then keep contact! Networking is darn important. We have an only badly translatable aphorism in German: "Eine Fürsprache ist besser als drei Fremdsprachen" - meaning: One person vouching for you is better than knowing three foreign languages.
Re Networking, attending meetups in your ( her) area can be helpful, and they're free.
 

Related to Exploring Career Paths with a MSc in Biomaterials and Biomechanics

1. What career options are available with a MSc in Biomaterials and Biomechanics?

With a MSc in Biomaterials and Biomechanics, you can pursue a career in a variety of fields such as biomedical engineering, bioengineering, medical device design and development, materials science, and tissue engineering. You can also work in industries such as pharmaceuticals, healthcare, and research and development.

2. What skills and knowledge will I gain from this degree?

This degree will provide you with a strong foundation in both biomaterials and biomechanics, as well as in-depth knowledge of the principles and applications of these fields. You will also develop critical thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills, as well as practical laboratory and research experience.

3. Can I pursue a PhD after completing this degree?

Yes, a MSc in Biomaterials and Biomechanics can serve as a valuable stepping stone towards a PhD in the same or related fields. This degree will provide you with a strong background and research experience, making you a competitive candidate for PhD programs.

4. What job opportunities are available in this field?

The job opportunities in this field are diverse and continue to grow with the advancements in technology and healthcare. Some potential job titles include biomedical engineer, research and development scientist, materials engineer, medical device designer, and tissue engineer. You can also work in academia as a researcher or professor.

5. How can I prepare for a career in this field during my MSc program?

To prepare for a career in this field during your MSc program, you can take advantage of opportunities such as internships, research projects, and networking events. You can also join professional organizations and attend conferences to stay updated on the latest developments in the field. Additionally, you can work on developing your technical skills and building a strong portfolio of projects and research work.

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