Exploring Dispersion in an Infinite Radiator

In summary, members discussed the characteristics of an expanding spherical wave of order 0 and whether it can be dispersive. It was suggested that in a vacuum, all wavelengths travel at the same velocity, making it non-dispersive. It was also noted that dispersion and attenuation are coupled through the dispersion relations.
  • #1
thadman
27
0
Let us assume we possesses a line radiator. It's extent is infinite and it radiates 360*.

As far as I understand, an expanding spherical wave of order 0 is not dispersive. I assume an expanding cylindrical wave of order 0 would possesses dispersion, however I am not certain.

Could any members offer insight on this?

Best Regards,
Thadman:biggrin:
 
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  • #2
i don't think any radiated wave can be dispersive in a vacuum, because all wavelengths travel at the same velocity. To be non-dispersive, there can not be any (wavelength dependent) attenuation either, because dispersion and attenuation are coupled through the dispersion relations. See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dispersion_relation
Bob S
 
  • #3


Dispersion in an infinite radiator is an interesting topic to explore. As you correctly stated, an expanding spherical wave of order 0 is not dispersive, meaning that it does not change its shape or frequency as it travels through space. This is because the wavefronts of an expanding spherical wave are always circular, regardless of the distance from the source.

On the other hand, an expanding cylindrical wave of order 0 would possess dispersion. This is because the wavefronts of a cylindrical wave are not always circular, but can be elliptical or even linear depending on the distance from the source. As the wave travels further away from the source, the shape of the wavefront changes, leading to dispersion.

Dispersion in an infinite radiator can also be seen in the frequency domain. An infinite radiator emits all frequencies equally, but as the wave travels through space, high frequencies will travel faster than low frequencies, leading to a dispersion of the wave. This can be observed in the frequency spectrum of an infinite radiator, where the amplitude of high frequencies will decrease compared to low frequencies.

I hope this helps to provide some insight into the concept of dispersion in an infinite radiator. It is a complex topic and further exploration and research can provide a deeper understanding. Thank you for bringing up this interesting topic for discussion. Best regards.
 

Related to Exploring Dispersion in an Infinite Radiator

What is dispersion in an infinite radiator?

Dispersion in an infinite radiator refers to the phenomenon in which a wave or signal is spread out or dispersed as it travels through an infinite medium. This can occur due to various factors such as diffraction, refraction, or scattering.

Why is exploring dispersion in an infinite radiator important?

Understanding dispersion in an infinite radiator is important in many fields, including physics, engineering, and telecommunications. It allows us to predict and control the behavior of waves as they propagate through different materials and environments.

What are some applications of dispersion in an infinite radiator?

Dispersion in an infinite radiator has numerous practical applications, such as in the design of optical fibers for communication, the development of radar technology, and the study of seismic waves in geology.

How is dispersion in an infinite radiator measured?

Dispersion in an infinite radiator can be measured using various techniques, including spectrometry, interferometry, and time-of-flight methods. These methods involve analyzing the properties of the wave, such as its wavelength and frequency, as it travels through the medium.

Are there any limitations to exploring dispersion in an infinite radiator?

While dispersion in an infinite radiator is a well-studied phenomenon, there are still limitations to our understanding. For example, the behavior of waves in complex mediums, such as biological tissues, is not fully understood, and further research is needed to improve our understanding of dispersion in these systems.

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