Exploring Ionised Atoms, Free Electrons & Energy Levels

In summary: If you want to ionize an atom, you have to remove an electron from it.In summary, the electron in the conduction band is not the same as an electron in the acceptor or donor band.
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cemtu
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Homework Statement:: Ionised atom, free electron, conduction band, donor energy level and acceptor energy level
Relevant Equations:: None

I have some confusion about the concept of some electronic bands and energy levels.

Beyond valance band, in a solid crystal lattice,

For an atom, can having at least one electron in the conduction band mean that the atom has been ionised?

Can having an electron in the donor energy level or acceptor energy level mean that the atom has been ionised?

Is free electron same as an electron in the conduction band or an electron in the acceptor or donor band?

Is an atom having a free electron an ionised atom?

I am super-super-confused...
 
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cemtu said:
Homework Statement:: Ionised atom, free electron, conduction band, donor energy level and acceptor energy level
Relevant Equations:: None

I have some confusion about the concept of some electronic bands and energy levels.

Beyond valance band, in a solid crystal lattice,

For an atom, can having at least one electron in the conduction band mean that the atom has been ionised?

Can having an electron in the donor energy level or acceptor energy level mean that the atom has been ionised?

Is free electron same as an electron in the conduction band or an electron in the acceptor or donor band?

Is an atom having a free electron an ionised atom?

I am super-super-confused...
I have some confusion about the concept of some electronic bands and energy levels.

You are not the only one.

Beyond valance band, in a solid crystal lattice,

?

For an atom, can having at least one electron in the conduction band mean that the atom has been ionised?

Yes according to the Wiki articles referenced below but most of my semiconductor books do not use the word ionised but rather charged for the Donors and Acceptors.

.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ionization
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donor_(semiconductors)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acceptor_(semiconductors)

Can having an electron in the donor energy level or acceptor energy level mean that the atom has been ionised?
Same answer but the electron is not in the acceptor level, the hole is.

Is free electron same as an electron in the conduction band or an electron in the acceptor or donor band?

A free electron is in the conduction band. Acceptor and donor are not energy bands but the type of dopant used to make P-type or N-type semiconductors respectively.Is an atom having a free electron an ionised atom?

Removing an electron from an atom makes the atom ionised if that's what you mean..

I am super-super-confused...

I've been there.
 
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cemtu said:
Homework Statement:: Ionised atom, free electron, conduction band, donor energy level and acceptor energy level
Relevant Equations:: None

I am super-super-confused...
I will not answer each of your questions now but point to the major source of your confusion.
The band structure in a crystalline solid refers to electronic states of the entire crystal. These maintain some of the form of atomic orbitals from which they are created but electrons in a solid do not belong to individual atoms. This is particularly true of the outer (highrer energy) bands. An electron in an insulator can be promoted to the conduction band from the valence band, but this does not mean any particular lattice atom has been ionized. Energy goes in and an electron is bopped to the excited state of the crystal.
 
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Related to Exploring Ionised Atoms, Free Electrons & Energy Levels

1. What are ionised atoms?

Ionised atoms are atoms that have lost or gained one or more electrons, resulting in a net positive or negative charge. This can occur through various processes such as heating, radiation, or chemical reactions.

2. How do free electrons differ from bound electrons?

Free electrons are electrons that are not attached to an atom and are able to move freely. Bound electrons, on the other hand, are tightly held by the nucleus of an atom and are not able to move as easily.

3. What is the significance of energy levels in atoms?

Energy levels in atoms refer to the specific energy states that electrons can occupy. These levels determine the energy and behavior of the electrons and play a crucial role in various chemical and physical processes, such as bonding and emission of light.

4. How are ionised atoms and free electrons related to energy levels?

Ionised atoms and free electrons are related to energy levels because the process of ionisation involves the transfer of energy to an atom, resulting in changes in the energy levels of its electrons. Free electrons also have specific energy levels that determine their behavior and interactions with other particles.

5. What applications does the study of ionised atoms, free electrons, and energy levels have?

The study of ionised atoms, free electrons, and energy levels has various applications in fields such as chemistry, physics, and engineering. It helps us understand the behavior of matter at a fundamental level and has practical applications in areas such as energy production, materials science, and electronics.

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