Exploring Possibilities: Aliens & Kingdoms

  • Thread starter Someone502
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Aliens
In summary: The conversation discusses whether or not aliens would get their own kingdom on Earth if we found them. It is uncertain if they would be able to survive on Earth if we found them, as they would have a different set of genes and environment suited to their home planet. If panspermia is a factor, then the aliens would have a separate tree of evolution. However, classification might still be similar to Earth due to common ancestry. There are many ways in which aliens could be different from Earth, from their genetic makeup to the environment they live in. It is hard to say exactly what would happen, but I think boxes with different trees would be a good way to organize information.
  • #1
Someone502
40
0
if we found aliens would they get their own kingdom? Or would we put them in the existing ones?
 
Biology news on Phys.org
  • #2
Someone502 said:
if we found aliens would they get their own kingdom? Or would we put them in the existing ones?


Wouldn't that depend on their biology and degree of connection to us? If panspermia is correct we might find the aliens to be closer cousins than otherwise. It's hard to imagine that convergent evolution, on the other hand, would reproduce all the details we use to define our own categories.
 
  • #3
I believe that life in other nvironments would be simaler to life here on earth, and we'd probably have a classification that fits them. :wink:
 
  • #4
add: only that people out there might not have looks like you and me :wink:
 
  • #5
Assuming the aliens shared no common ancestors with any Earth life, it seems to me that they would need their own kingdom.
 
  • #6
James R said:
Assuming the aliens shared no common ancestors with any Earth life, it seems to me that they would need their own kingdom.
If you think about it, life here had to develop under certain conditions, and all abiotic factors lead to the different kingdoms. Because to be able to live this long and adapt, evolution had to occur at some point. So if there's a habitable place somewhere else in the galaxy, they'd have to follow the same evolutionary basis, and therefore, follow the same biological rules. :wink:
 
  • #7
Our evolutionary "tree" (with the kingdoms at the foundation) is a representation of ancestry and common descent. Unless, as SelfAdjoint said, panspermia is a factor, then the alien species would have a separate biogenesis and evolutionary history. Therefore, it would have a separate tree.

However, I suspect astrobiologists would use similar classifications/terms for alien species (bacteria-like species, plant-like species, animal-like species, etc.) in order to facilitate our understanding of them.

I assume something totally new (e.g., silicon-based life form?) would get a new kingdom.
 
  • #8
I guess it would all depend on their origin, and how/who we would choose to classify them. It's possible that the conditions of Life on Earth are the only way for life to start, it is also equally possible that under different conditions life could form. Carbon is the essential atom on Earth, but there is nothing preventing another planet from being based off of some other element, known or unknown.

You can find people to argue about classification of species on Earth, let alone what would happen regarding life from another origin.
 
  • #9
We could even find a different type of "life" one that follows different biological rules.
 
  • #10
They would get a totally new independent tree of evolution.

Sicilon life would work but has great disadvantages compared to carbon based life.

But alien carbon based life can still be totally different from life on Earth in very many ways. How different or how similar is hard to say. And this goes for all kinds of levels of organisation.

Also, we might get boxes with trees. Every time of environment or planet type could get its own box with several independent trees. Or maybe organisation based on structure would work better. These things are hard to tell. We cannot look into the future or guess right for a 100%.
 
  • #11
Aliens would NOT be classified into an existing kingdom. The biomes would not be similar enough outside of Earth for aliens to grouped thus. Remember, if there were aliens, it is not guaranteed that they would even be able to survive by breathing oxygen. They would have their own genes and traits suited to their specific home environment.
 
  • #12
amaranthis12 said:
Aliens would NOT be classified into an existing kingdom. The biomes would not be similar enough outside of Earth for aliens to grouped thus. Remember, if there were aliens, it is not guaranteed that they would even be able to survive by breathing oxygen. They would have their own genes and traits suited to their specific home environment.
I think first we need to define what we mean by "alien".

In the case of "panspermia" or "exogenesis", then there would be some "common" ancestry, however I would agree, not enough similarity to be grouped into an exisiting kingdom, as you, selfadjoint and others mentioned. Of course there are some that say we are a breeding experiment of aliens. :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:

Related to Exploring Possibilities: Aliens & Kingdoms

1. Are there really aliens out there?

The existence of extraterrestrial life is a topic of ongoing scientific research and debate. While there is no definitive proof of aliens, there is also no conclusive evidence that they do not exist. The vastness of the universe and the potential for other habitable planets make it a possibility that there could be other forms of life in the universe.

2. How do scientists search for aliens?

Scientists use a variety of methods to search for signs of alien life. This includes listening for radio signals from other planets, studying the atmospheres of exoplanets for biomarkers, and searching for microbial life on other planets. Many different organizations and scientific teams are involved in these efforts.

3. What are the most likely forms of alien life?

It is difficult to say what the most likely forms of alien life could be, as we have only ever encountered life on Earth. However, many scientists believe that microbial life is the most probable, as it can survive in extreme environments and may exist on other planets or moons in our own solar system.

4. Could aliens be more advanced than humans?

It is possible that there could be alien civilizations that are more advanced than humans. However, it is also possible that there are civilizations that are less advanced or at a similar level of development. The lack of evidence for advanced alien civilizations could suggest that they are rare in the universe.

5. How would the discovery of aliens impact humanity?

The discovery of aliens could have a significant impact on humanity, both culturally and scientifically. It could challenge our understanding of our place in the universe and open up new avenues for research and exploration. It could also have social and political implications, depending on the nature of the aliens and how their existence is perceived by different groups.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Medical
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Special and General Relativity
3
Replies
98
Views
3K
Replies
26
Views
2K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
25
Views
7K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
28
Views
4K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
5
Views
2K
Back
Top