Exploring Sound Waves: Can a 'Sound Mill' be Created?

In summary, the conversation revolved around a project called Einstein on the Beach that involves creating a project on a beach and using sound as a source of energy. The possibility of creating a sound mill was discussed, but it was determined that the loudness and intensity of sound would make it difficult to create without causing damage. The idea of using a light mill instead was suggested as a more feasible option. The conversation also touched on the working mechanism of a light mill.
  • #1
Amroth
3
0
*please move if in wrong forum*

Im taking the IB at a school in New York and every 11th grader has to do a project called Einstein on the Beach. It involves creating your own project and doing it on the beach that the school will travel to on a day trip. I am trying to come up with a good project and I was wondering. Is it possible to create some sort of 'sound mill'? Sort of like a water mill, just that it reacts to sound waves? I was thinking maybe it would work if one could polarize them, but then i realized that they are longitudinal, not transverse. Is there possibilities in this project?

Thanks,
-Lars
 
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  • #2
Since sound consists of pressure waves, it can certainly be harnessed to do work. That, after all, is what a microphone does. If you specifically mean to have some kind of vanes or paddles that turn because of it, I think that you and all of your classmates would be deafened long before the sound reached a high enough level to move anything like that. You can maximize whatever effect you do get by funnelling the sound as with the 'horn' on the original mechanical recording devices.
 
  • #3
So basically there's no way i could arrange this without ending up deaf and with bleeding ears..? Couldn't there be some way to isolate the sounds waves?
 
  • #4
You could take a boombox and an automatic wristwatch that has stopped, place the watch over the speakers and rock out till the watch starts?
 
  • #5
Speaking of mills

Since you'll be on the beach anyway.. How about an experiment with a light mill ? :rolleyes: (http://www.globalwarmingsolutions.co.uk/crooks_radiometer_and_otheoscope.htm )

I've always been fascinated putting one of these in sunshine and watching the paddle spin at full tilt. Hmmmm I wonder if we can measure the efficiency of energy conversion, from solar to mechanical, for one of these.
 
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  • #6
So how does it work? Wikipedia doesn't say anything about it.
 
  • #7
Mk said:
So how does it work? Wikipedia doesn't say anything about it.
If you're referring to Crooke's Radiometer I mentioned, look at explanations 3 and 4 at the following link http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclopedia/C/Cr/Crookes_radiometer.htm
 
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  • #8
Wow, the light mill sounds very interesting. Maybe i should try something like that, because it does not seem like the sound mill will be that easy to make work...
 

Related to Exploring Sound Waves: Can a 'Sound Mill' be Created?

1. Can sound waves really be used to create a "sound mill"?

Yes, sound waves can be harnessed to create a "sound mill" or a device that uses sound as its source of energy. This is possible through the phenomenon of sound-induced vibration, where sound waves cause an object to vibrate, which in turn generates energy.

2. How does a sound mill work?

A sound mill typically consists of a sound source, such as a loudspeaker, and a resonant object, such as a membrane or a tube. When sound waves from the source reach the resonant object, they cause it to vibrate at its natural frequency, generating energy that can be used to power a motor or other device.

3. What materials can be used to create a sound mill?

The materials used for a sound mill depend on the specific design and purpose of the device. Generally, any object that is able to vibrate in response to sound waves can be used, such as membranes, tubes, or even piezoelectric materials. The key is to find a material that is lightweight, resonant, and efficient in converting sound energy into mechanical energy.

4. Can a sound mill be used as a renewable source of energy?

Yes, a sound mill can be considered a form of renewable energy, as it harnesses the energy from sound waves which are constantly present in our environment. However, the amount of energy that can be generated from a sound mill may be limited and may not be as efficient as other renewable energy sources such as solar or wind power.

5. Are there any real-life applications of sound mills?

Yes, there are several real-life applications of sound mills, such as in electronic devices that use piezoelectric materials, in musical instruments that amplify sound, and in hydrophones used for underwater communication. They can also be used in developing countries as a low-cost and sustainable source of energy for small-scale devices.

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