Exploring the Consequences of Exceeding the Speed of Light in a Spaceship

In summary, exceeding the speed of light is not possible and would result in the spaceship being compressed to zero length, having infinite mass, and its internal time stopping. This concept is similar to the question of what is beyond our universe and is not a valid question. The thread was closed after this explanation was given.
  • #1
I'm not exactly sure but I want to know, what would happen if a spaceship was to exceed the speed of light?
 
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  • #2
It would turn into pink unicorns. You can't go faster than light to it's an invalid question.
 
  • #3
Mr. Paradox said:
I'm not exactly sure but I want to know, what would happen if a spaceship was to exceed the speed of light?

The question you asked is comparable to the question "What is outside our universe?”

The question has no meaning. Stephen Hawking compared it to asking, “What is north of the North Pole?".
 
  • #4
Mr. Paradox said:
I'm not exactly sure but I want to know, what would happen if a spaceship was to exceed the speed of light?

It would be compressed to zero length, its internal time would stop, and it would have infinate mass.

Since these things cannot happen, it should be clear that superluminal speed is not possible.
 
  • #5
Jack21222 said:
It would be compressed to zero length, its internal time would stop, and it would have infinate mass.

Since these things cannot happen, it should be clear that superluminal speed is not possible.

No, the correct answer was given in the first post.

Thread closed.
 

1. What happens if an object travels faster than the speed of light?

If an object were to travel faster than the speed of light, it would violate the fundamental laws of physics and cause a paradox. According to Einstein's theory of relativity, as an object approaches the speed of light, its mass increases infinitely and requires an infinite amount of energy to continue accelerating. Therefore, it is impossible for an object to surpass the speed of light.

2. Is it possible for anything to travel at the speed of light?

According to our current understanding of physics, no object with mass can travel at the speed of light. However, particles with no mass, such as photons, can travel at the speed of light. This is because they do not have mass to increase as they approach the speed of light.

3. How is the speed of light measured?

The speed of light is measured as approximately 299,792,458 meters per second in a vacuum. This is the maximum speed at which all energy, matter, and information can travel in the universe. It is also used as the basis for the speed of light in other mediums, such as air or water.

4. Can the speed of light be exceeded in other dimensions or alternate universes?

There is currently no evidence to suggest that the speed of light can be exceeded in any other dimensions or alternate universes. The speed of light is a fundamental constant in our universe and is not affected by other dimensions or alternate universes.

5. How does the theory of relativity relate to the speed of light?

The theory of relativity, proposed by Albert Einstein, explains how the laws of physics are the same for all observers, regardless of their relative motion. This theory also states that the speed of light is the same for all observers, regardless of their frame of reference. This means that no matter how fast an observer is moving, they will always measure the speed of light as approximately 299,792,458 meters per second.

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