Exploring the Effects of Gravity on Laser Light: A Comparative Analysis

In summary, the path of light from a star and laser light will both bend when moving beside a large mass, but the way they bend may differ depending on the initial direction of the photons. Light does not cause space to vibrate, but follows a geodesic path through curved space.
  • #1

Tyloki

I understand that the path of light from a Star bends when it moves beside a large mass.

My question is this:

Does the path of Laser Light bend when it moves beside a large mass, and if so, does it bend in the same way the light from a star bends?

I'm curious to know if the fact that light from a star goes in all directions makes any difference on the way the light travels when it meets a planet or other large mass.
 
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  • #2
Originally posted by Tyloki
I'm curious to know if the fact that light from a star goes in all directions makes any difference on the way the light travels when it meets a planet or other large mass.
Each individual photon will follow the shortest possible path through the curved space. If the photons all have different initial directions, as from a nearby star, they will all follow different paths through the space.

Laser light, on the other hand, consists of photons all going in the same direction, and thus all the photons will follow virtually the same trajectory through the curved space.

- Warren
 
  • #3
Basically, if we were to follow a single photon from a star and a single photon from a laser, the 2 would follow the same path when traveling around a large plant?

I'm asking because I'm curious about the nature of light with respect to space-time. Do light waves cause Space to vibrate, and if so, are those waves in any way similar to the waves on the surface of a puddle? If they are, is it at all possible that the mass would cause some sort of interference that would cause the photons from star light to move in a different way than the ones from a laser?
 
  • #4
Originally posted by Tyloki
Basically, if we were to follow a single photon from a star and a single photon from a laser, the 2 would follow the same path when traveling around a large plant?
Assuming the two photons are traveling the same initial direction, yes.
Do light waves cause Space to vibrate, and if so, are those waves in any way similar to the waves on the surface of a puddle?
No, space does not vibrate.

- Warren
 
  • #5
I fail to see the difference in Photons that come from a star and from a laser...so if the protons are the same then how could their travel be different along the same path? yes? no? do I not have the full idea of a laser or of a proton?
 
  • #6
Originally posted by Coughlan
I fail to see the difference in Photons that come from a star and from a laser...
Exactly correct. Assuming they are traveling in the same direction initially, the photons from either source would follow the same path.

- Warren
 
  • #7


Originally posted by chroot
Each individual photon will follow the shortest possible path through the curved space. If the photons all have different initial directions, as from a nearby star, they will all follow different paths through the space.
That is not exactly correct. Light follows a geodesci i.e. a path of extremal length. In the case of light that extremal length is always zero. However this is not a Eucledian distance but another kind of "distance."

For definition of "geodesic" see
http://www.geocities.com/physics_world/ma/geodesic.htm

Pete
 

1. What is the purpose of exploring the effects of gravity on laser light?

The purpose of exploring the effects of gravity on laser light is to understand how gravity affects the propagation of light and how it can be used to manipulate and control laser beams. This can have practical applications in fields such as astronomy, telecommunications, and laser technology.

2. How does gravity affect laser light?

Gravity affects laser light by causing it to bend or curve as it travels through space. This is known as gravitational lensing and is a result of the warping of space-time around massive objects such as planets, stars, and galaxies.

3. What is the comparative analysis method used in this study?

The comparative analysis method used in this study involves comparing the behavior of laser light in the presence of gravity to its behavior in the absence of gravity. This allows for a better understanding of the specific effects of gravity on laser light.

4. What are some potential practical applications of this research?

This research can have practical applications in fields such as astronomy, where it can be used to study and observe distant objects that are affected by gravity. It can also be used in telecommunications to improve the accuracy and precision of laser-based communication systems.

5. How can this research contribute to our overall understanding of gravity and light?

This research can contribute to our overall understanding of gravity and light by providing insights into the complex relationship between the two. It can also help us further explore the properties and behaviors of light and the fundamental laws of physics that govern our universe.

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