Exploring the Fate of Beta Particles in Space

In summary, the conversation discusses the behavior and stability of a beta particle in space. The speaker asks about what would happen to the particle in empty space and if it would decompose. They also question if a powerful GM could detect the particle and why it decomposes. However, the other person in the conversation explains that beta particles, which are high-energy electrons or positrons, have a very long lifespan and do not decay for billions of years. They also provide a link to further information about beta particles. The conversation concludes with a clarification about the decomposition of the particle and the speaker expressing their confusion.
  • #1
hagopbul
357
36
If I have to send a beta particle in space and if the space is completely empty (from matter and energy just imagine!)
What would happen to the particle?
If I put a very good GM in 1 Km from the source should I detect the beta particle if the beta particle has the power of 0.5 Mev?
Dose the beta particle decomposition in the emptiness of the space and why (there is nothing in that space to absorb the beta particle.) should the beta particle just continue moving until it hits something that absorb it or not!
Sorry about my Q maybe it look like a naive Question :smile: but really believe me I never get a answer that make me rest.
thank you all
 
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  • #2
Hi hagopbul !

Well, a beta particle is very stable, so - from good ol' Newton's first law - it should carry on for ever, or until it hits something! :smile:
 
  • #3
NO wrong beta particle is not that stable and WILL decomposition in little time the Q is why?
 
  • #4
hagopbul said:
NO wrong beta particle is not that stable and WILL decomposition in little time the Q is why?

No, a beta particle is either an electron or a positron, and both have mean lifetimes over a million billion times the present age of the universe! :smile:

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Particle_decay
 
  • #5
No this is a electron and yes the life time of it is huge ,but in beta particle the life time is small and may main Q is not the time it is Why?
 
  • #7
hagopbul said:
No this is a electron and yes the life time of it is huge ,but in beta particle the life time is small and may main Q is not the time it is Why?
Perhaps you are thinking of the half-life of whatever created the beta particle?
 
  • #8
my mistake it is huge[age] but why it decomposition disappear ??
 
  • #9
I don't understand - what do you mean about the decomposition disappearing? :confused:
 
  • #10
the beta particle decay after [t] time Why?
 
  • #11
It doesn't decay

hagopbul said:
the beta particle decay after [t] time Why?

It doesn't decay!

(Well, not for millions of billions of times longer than the age of the universe …)
 
  • #12
yes it decay the Q is why? I don't care about time
 

1. What are beta particles and how are they produced?

Beta particles are high-energy, negatively charged particles that are emitted during the process of radioactive decay. They are produced when a neutron in an atom's nucleus is converted into a proton and an electron.

2. How do beta particles travel through space?

Beta particles travel through space at very high speeds, close to the speed of light. They can travel in a straight line or be deflected by magnetic fields, depending on their charge.

3. What happens to beta particles as they travel through space?

As beta particles travel through space, they can interact with other particles and lose energy. They can also be absorbed by other materials, such as the atmosphere of a planet or the hull of a spacecraft. Additionally, beta particles can combine with other particles to form new elements.

4. Can beta particles be harmful to astronauts in space?

Yes, beta particles can be harmful to astronauts in space if they are exposed to high levels of radiation. Beta particles have the ability to penetrate the human body and can cause damage to cells and DNA, which can lead to health problems such as cancer.

5. How do scientists study the fate of beta particles in space?

Scientists study the fate of beta particles in space using instruments such as particle detectors and spectrometers. These instruments can measure the energy and trajectory of beta particles, as well as identify the elements they interact with. Scientists also use computer models and simulations to better understand the behavior of beta particles in different environments.

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