Exploring the Possibility of a Vacuum-Based Ooze

  • Thread starter daward74
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In summary, the topic of whether or not it is possible for a gelatinous, ooze kind of substance to exist in the vacuum of space is a bit of a mystery. However, it is plausible based on the low freezing point of such a substance and the presence of moisture.
  • #1
daward74
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Is it possible for a gelatinous, ooze kind of substance to exist in the vacuum of space? If it is possible, what would such a substance likely be comprised of?
 
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  • #2
Ok I've seen a lot of questions asked here on PF, but I just have to ask: What made you think of this?

As a partial response, by "ooze" I think you mean some relatively viscous substance. And the answer is it is probably not possible simply because the vacuum of space is so cold. If something like this ooze were to exist, it would immediately become rigid due to the low temperature (I don't see how it could come to be in the first place though).
 
  • #3
There's not much in the vacuum of space.
That said, it's not a perfect vacuum. The main thing you find is dust and dust big enough to be considered micro-meteors (which can be going v. fast, at that!)
 
  • #4
Yes, I imagine it is a rather strange question to ask. To answer yours, I am a writer and I have a concept in my head for something (far out sci-fi) and wanted to know if there was any scientific base to it. It seems you confirmed my initial thought which is that an ooze would require moisture to be present and such moisture in the vacuum of space would freeze, rendering the substance distinctly unlike ooze.
Thanks for your consideration of my crazy question :-)
 
  • #5
daward, this idea reminds me of the sci-fi classics: "The Blob" and of course "Green Slime". Maybe your ooze wouldn't freeze if it was radioactive?!
 
  • #6
daward74 said:
Is it possible for a gelatinous, ooze kind of substance to exist in the vacuum of space? If it is possible, what would such a substance likely be comprised of?
google has something under "vacuum putty"
may not be what you want
 
  • #7
Indeed it would be reminiscent of those classics! After reading the replies here, I was considering the possibility of an "unknown" substance which has an incredibly low freezing point and as this particular substance grows nearer to our sun, it begins to thaw, becoming the ooze-like substance. Great forum here, though and thanks for your prompt replies. I'm coming here for all my physics questions from now on!
 

Related to Exploring the Possibility of a Vacuum-Based Ooze

1. What is a vacuum-based ooze?

A vacuum-based ooze is a theoretical substance that is created by removing all air and gas particles from a sealed container, leaving only a vacuum state. This creates a unique material with properties that are different from any known substance.

2. How is a vacuum-based ooze created?

A vacuum-based ooze can be created by using specialized equipment to remove all air and gas particles from a sealed container. This process is called vacuum pumping and is commonly used in scientific and industrial settings.

3. What are the potential applications of a vacuum-based ooze?

A vacuum-based ooze has the potential to be used in various applications, such as in advanced materials, energy storage, and even in space exploration. Its unique properties could also have implications in industries such as aerospace, electronics, and medicine.

4. What are the challenges in exploring the possibility of a vacuum-based ooze?

One of the main challenges in exploring the possibility of a vacuum-based ooze is creating a stable and controllable vacuum state. Another challenge is finding ways to manipulate and utilize the unique properties of the ooze in a practical and efficient manner.

5. Are there any potential risks associated with a vacuum-based ooze?

As with any new material or technology, there may be potential risks associated with a vacuum-based ooze. These risks could include accidental exposure to high vacuum levels, as well as potential environmental and health hazards if the ooze is not properly contained and disposed of.

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