Exploring the Possibility of e=mck and h.nu Proportional to mc

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In summary, the theory of relativity states that the speed of light is the limit for all matter, energy, and information. However, in his mass-energy equation, Einstein uses c squared, which is not the speed of light but a number with units of length squared over time squared. This number is represented by the constant k in the equation. Additionally, the ratio of Planck's constant times frequency to mass times the speed of light is also a constant with a value equal to c. This value is not just a number, but has units and should not be confused with the speed of light.
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GautamAishwarya
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when theory of relativity declares speed of light to be the limit for speeds of all matter and energy and information. then, how can einstein in his mass-energy eqn talk about c squared. we can't talk about any velocity more than c.
it is possible that e = mck where the value of constant k shall be equal to value(only of magnitude only) of c.
also ,
h.nu is directly proportional to mc, and ratio of h.nu to mc is the constant with value equalling c.
 
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  • #2
Don't confuse arithmetic with physics. c is a number (with units). It happens to be the speed of light but it is just a number. c2 is another number that is NOT the speed of light. In fact, since c2 has units of length2/time2, it cannot be the speed of anything. If you want to say "the value of constant k shall be equal to value(only of magnitude only) of c", fine (well, not "magnitude only" because you have to take the units into account), but that was what was meant all along.
 
  • #3


First of all, it is important to understand that Einstein's mass-energy equation, E=mc², is a fundamental principle of the theory of relativity. It states that energy (E) and mass (m) are equivalent and can be converted into one another, with the speed of light (c) as the proportionality constant. This equation has been proven to be accurate in numerous experiments and is a cornerstone of modern physics.

Now, to address the concern about the speed of light being the limit for speeds of all matter, energy, and information, it is important to understand that this limit only applies to objects with mass. The speed of light is the maximum speed that any object with mass can attain, according to the theory of relativity. However, this does not mean that all forms of energy and information are limited by the speed of light.

For example, photons, which are particles of light, have no mass and can travel at the speed of light. This is why the equation h.nu (where h is Planck's constant and nu is the frequency of the photon) is proportional to mc, as both sides of the equation are describing energy. The ratio of h.nu to mc is simply a constant, and in this case, it is equal to the speed of light.

In the same way, the possibility of e=mck, where k is equal to the value of c, is not contradictory to the theory of relativity. This equation simply shows the relationship between energy, mass, and the speed of light, and does not imply that anything can travel faster than the speed of light. It is important to remember that the value of c in this equation is not a velocity, but rather a proportionality constant.

In conclusion, Einstein's mass-energy equation and the concept of the speed of light being the limit for speeds of matter and energy are not contradictory. They are both fundamental principles of the theory of relativity and have been proven to be accurate in numerous experiments. The possibility of e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc is simply a way to express the relationship between energy, mass, and the speed of light.
 

Related to Exploring the Possibility of e=mck and h.nu Proportional to mc

What is the significance of e=mck and h.nu being proportional to mc?

The equation e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc is known as the mass-energy equivalence formula. It states that mass and energy are two forms of the same thing, with a constant proportionality factor of c (the speed of light) squared. This has significant implications in the field of physics, as it allows for the conversion of mass to energy and vice versa.

Is e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc a proven concept?

Yes, the concept of mass-energy equivalence has been proven through numerous experiments, most notably the famous E=mc² equation proposed by Albert Einstein in his theory of special relativity. This concept has been extensively tested and confirmed through various experiments, including nuclear reactions and particle accelerators.

How does e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc relate to the speed of light?

The speed of light, c, plays a crucial role in the equation e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc. It is used as a constant proportionality factor that links the mass and energy components of the equation. It also demonstrates the relationship between mass and energy, showing that the speed of light is the maximum speed at which energy can travel.

What is the role of Planck's constant in e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc?

Planck's constant, h, is another essential element in the equation e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc. It is a fundamental constant in quantum mechanics that relates the energy of a photon (h.nu) to its frequency (nu). When combined with c, it allows for the conversion between mass and energy and provides a more accurate understanding of the relationship between the two.

Are there any practical applications of e=mck and h.nu proportional to mc?

Yes, the concept of mass-energy equivalence has several practical applications, such as in nuclear power and nuclear weapons. It also plays a crucial role in understanding the behavior of particles at high speeds and in the development of technologies like particle accelerators. Additionally, this equation has been used to explain phenomena such as black holes and the creation of the universe.

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