Exploring the Possibility of the LSP as the Graviton

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In summary, the conversation discusses the individual's interest in particle physics and their efforts to learn more about the field. They pose a question about the possibility of the graviton being the LSP, but it is clarified that the graviton is massless and therefore not a part of that. However, the superpartner of the graviton, the gravitino, can have mass and potentially be the LSP in some models.
  • #1
AmagicalFishy
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Hey, guys.

I'm going to start off by saying I know near nothing regarding physics and don't claim to be more than completely ignorant in anything passed the fields considered pre-calculus. I have a huge interest in particle physics, though—and have decided to take a more academically rigerous path to actually learn physics, in depth.

Anyway, my interest in the field compels me to do things like download lectures, and while I can only comprehend about 20% of the things that are over-simplified, I enjoy listening to them anyway (and try to grasp onto the few concepts that I can).

So, that is where this question is coming from. . .

Is it possible that the LSP is the graviton? If everything were to decay down to the LSP, perhaps the graviton doesn't have a super-symmetric particle—and is like the "0" in numbers (with no opposite)?

Or is that an idea that is physically impossible?
 
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. . . Anyone?
 
  • #3
When you talk about the LSP, you implicitly are talking about particles with mass. The graviton is massless and therefore is not a part of that.

Now, it turns out that the superpartner of the graviton (the gravitino), does usually have mass and can in some models be the LSP.
 

Related to Exploring the Possibility of the LSP as the Graviton

1) What is the LSP and how is it related to the graviton?

The LSP stands for Lightest Supersymmetric Particle, which is a hypothetical particle predicted by supersymmetry theories. It is believed that the LSP could potentially be the graviton, which is the hypothetical particle responsible for the force of gravity.

2) What evidence supports the possibility of the LSP being the graviton?

Currently, there is no concrete evidence to support the LSP being the graviton. However, some theories suggest that the properties of the LSP, such as its mass and interactions, could align with the expected properties of the graviton.

3) How would discovering the LSP as the graviton impact our understanding of gravity?

If the LSP is indeed the graviton, it would significantly impact our understanding of gravity and the fundamental forces of the universe. It could potentially provide a unifying theory that combines gravity with the other three fundamental forces.

4) How are scientists exploring the possibility of the LSP as the graviton?

Scientists are exploring this possibility through various experiments, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. The LHC is currently searching for evidence of supersymmetry and the LSP, which could potentially shed light on the nature of the graviton.

5) What are the potential implications if the LSP is not the graviton?

If the LSP is not the graviton, it would not necessarily invalidate supersymmetry theories. However, it would require scientists to reconsider their understanding of the graviton and continue the search for this elusive particle. It could also lead to the development of new theories to explain the force of gravity.

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