Exploring the Shape of Spacetime

In summary: , تدريس في الصورة الأولى للسوق الإقتصادية يفعل كثيراً من العمل وأعطى الإخوة الأخرين أجمل منها شرحاً في موضوع صورة سوقهم في السوق العربية للقرآن ال
  • #1
ريمان
18
0
hi every one


I'm asked about the spacetime and his shape

is spacetmie like the sea or waht?


thank for everyone
 
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  • #2
is there anybody hire

yahooooooo
 
  • #3
Hello ريمان,


From Wikipedia:

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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For other uses of this term, see Spacetime (disambiguation).
In physics, spacetime is a mathematical model that combines three-dimensional space and one-dimensional time into a single construct called the space-time continuum, in which time plays the role of the 4th dimension. According to Euclidean space perception, our universe has three dimensions of space, and one dimension of time. By combining space and time into a single manifold, physicists have significantly simplified a good deal of physical theory, as well as described in a more uniform way the workings of the universe at both the supergalactic and subatomic levels.

In classical mechanics, the use of spacetime over Euclidean space is optional, as time is independent of mechanical motion in three dimensions. In relativistic contexts, however, time cannot be separated from the three dimensions of space as it depends on an object's velocity relative to the speed of light.

I hope this helps.
TDS
 
  • #4
tank you

is spactime like this http://www.blog.speculist.com/archives/spacetime.gif"

is Earth above spacetime or in spacetime

please help me this is very important informations for me


yyyyyyyyyyyhooooooooooooo
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #5
My understanding is that spacetime is basically a frame of reference for the entire universe. That means that whatever is in the universe is "in" spacetime, including the earth. I can't imagine what would be "outside" spacetime.
 
  • #6
are you mean the Earth is in spacetime not above spacetime
like this http://www.blog.speculist.com/archives/spacetime.gif
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #7
Yes, that's right. The Earth is in spacetime. The picture just shows one surface out of many I'm guessing. That surface happens to run under the image of the earth. They can't show all the surfaces that make up spacetime in the picture otherwise you wouldn't be able to see the earth.
 
  • #8
tank you very much you are so smart

ريمان
 

Related to Exploring the Shape of Spacetime

1. What is spacetime?

Spacetime is a concept that combines the three dimensions of space (length, width, height) with the dimension of time. It is often represented as a four-dimensional continuum, where an object's position is described by its coordinates in both space and time.

2. How is spacetime related to gravity?

According to Einstein's theory of general relativity, gravity is the result of the curvature of spacetime caused by the presence of massive objects. This means that objects with mass, like planets and stars, create a "dent" in the fabric of spacetime, causing other objects to fall towards them.

3. How do we measure the shape of spacetime?

The shape of spacetime is measured using mathematical equations, specifically the Einstein field equations, which describe the relationship between the curvature of spacetime and the distribution of matter and energy within it. Scientists also use observations and experiments, such as the bending of light around massive objects, to confirm the predictions of these equations.

4. Can spacetime be distorted or manipulated?

Yes, spacetime can be distorted or manipulated by the presence of massive objects, as well as by high-energy events such as black holes or supernovae. This distortion can also be created artificially through advanced technologies, such as gravitational wave detectors.

5. How does understanding the shape of spacetime impact our daily lives?

While the effects of spacetime may not be noticeable in our daily lives, understanding its shape and behavior is crucial for many modern technologies, such as GPS navigation systems. It also allows us to study and better understand the universe, from the motion of celestial bodies to the origins of the universe itself.

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