Exploring the Strong Nuclear Force

In summary, the conversation discusses how the strong nuclear force works and a link to an article that explains it. They also mention the decay of neutrons and how it produces a proton, electron and electron anti-neutrino. The article also mentions the possibility of the neutron decaying into a hydrogen atom, which the participants find amusing. However, the article is not entirely accurate and has some flaws in its explanation. Overall, the conversation highlights the importance of doing thorough research before asking open-ended questions.
  • #1
icvotria
51
1
Thank goodness...

...PF has taught me how to sniff out a crackpot. I was wondering about the strong nuclear force and how it worked and stuff and I thought I should do some research before I posted another incredibly open-ended question here :rolleyes: so I googled "strong nuclear force explained" and this is the only thing that came up: www.iw.net/~a_plutonium/File026.html[/URL]. This was my favourite part [QUOTE]every neutron has the potential of radioactively decaying into a hydrogen atom...the neutron, in any particular atom when it radioactively decays emits 1 proton, 1 electron, and perhaps 1 neutrino.[/QUOTE] I love that perhaps! :smile:
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
The decay of the neutron is called "beta decay," and it's products are indeed a proton, an electron, and an electron anti-neutrino. You're right though, there's no "perhaps" about it -- it's always there.

- Warren
 
  • #3
Not exactly.

A free neutron will decay into a proton, electron (beta particle) and electron-associated anti-neutrino. The statement about emitted is awkward.

A neutron inside an atomic nucleus is usually stable, unless there is an excess of neutrons. If beta-decay does occur, the neutron decays to a proton, but it does not produce a hydrogen atom. The charge on the nucleus will increase by 1.
 
  • #4
In the article he's trying to say that the hydrogen atom is the most elementary of all particles and that's his example. It cracked me up. It's like 'beta decay = 1 elecron + 1 proton = Hydrogen oh yeah, and that other thing, but let's forget about that, it's not important and it ruins my theory'
 
  • #5
icvotria,

Now -that's- crackpottery. :smile:

- Warren
 

Related to Exploring the Strong Nuclear Force

What is the Strong Nuclear Force?

The Strong Nuclear Force is one of the four fundamental forces of nature, along with gravity, electromagnetism, and the weak nuclear force. It is responsible for holding the nucleus of an atom together by binding protons and neutrons together.

How does the Strong Nuclear Force work?

The Strong Nuclear Force works by exchanging particles called gluons between quarks, which are the building blocks of protons and neutrons. This exchange of gluons creates a strong attraction between quarks, which keeps them bound together in a nucleus.

What is the range of the Strong Nuclear Force?

The Strong Nuclear Force has a very short range, only extending about 10^-15 meters. This means it only affects particles that are extremely close together, such as those in the nucleus of an atom.

How does the Strong Nuclear Force differ from the other fundamental forces?

The Strong Nuclear Force is the strongest of the four fundamental forces, but it also has the shortest range. It is responsible for holding the nucleus of an atom together, while the other forces primarily act on larger scales.

What are the applications of understanding the Strong Nuclear Force?

Understanding the Strong Nuclear Force is essential for understanding the structure of matter at the smallest scales. It also has practical applications in fields such as nuclear energy and medicine, where knowledge of the Strong Nuclear Force is necessary for developing new technologies.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy Media
Replies
11
Views
750
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Atomic and Condensed Matter
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
14
Views
3K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
943
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
6
Views
1K
Back
Top