Extra Dimesions (the Calabi-Yau shape)

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In summary, the conversation discusses the complexity of the mathematics behind a geometrical shape and the difficulty in imagining shapes in higher dimensions. The concept of Joyce manifolds is also mentioned and it is noted that our brains are not evolved to visualize beyond three dimensions.
  • #1
Yaaks
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Can anyone give me more insight on this Topic...
The mathematics of this geometrical shape is quite complex..,, its hard for me to imagine these shapes (infact i find it very difficult to imagine space wrap with the three spatial dimesions, its easier to imagine them with two dimesions).
and please brief me about Joyce mainfolds..

ThanX
 
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  • #2
first, all tries to image the warps cause they are warped into the foruth dimension which we can't see are futile. Our brain is evolved to only be able to see 3 or imagen 3. Its simply not possicle. that's why scientist use 2d-3d when they imagen a extra dimension.
 
  • #3
for your interest in this topic! The Calabi-Yau shape is a type of manifold, which is a mathematical concept that describes a space that is locally similar to Euclidean space. In simpler terms, it is a shape that can be described using a set of coordinates, much like how we use x, y, and z coordinates to describe points in 3-dimensional space.

The mathematics behind the Calabi-Yau shape is indeed complex and can be difficult to visualize. This shape is often used in string theory to explain the existence of extra dimensions beyond the three spatial dimensions we are familiar with.

Joyce manifolds are a type of Calabi-Yau shape that was discovered by mathematician Dominic Joyce in 1996. They are a specific type of Calabi-Yau shape that has properties that make them useful in certain areas of mathematics and theoretical physics. They are also often used in string theory and have been studied extensively by mathematicians and physicists.

Overall, the study of extra dimensions and Calabi-Yau shapes is a fascinating and ongoing area of research in mathematics and physics. It requires a deep understanding of advanced mathematical concepts and is constantly evolving as new discoveries are made. I hope this brief explanation helps to give you more insight into this topic.
 

1. What are extra dimensions?

Extra dimensions refer to theoretical spatial dimensions beyond the three dimensions (length, width, and height) that we are familiar with in our everyday lives. These dimensions are postulated by some scientific theories, such as string theory, to exist beyond our observable universe.

2. What is the Calabi-Yau shape?

The Calabi-Yau shape is a complex, six-dimensional shape that is often used in string theory to describe the extra dimensions. It is named after mathematicians Eugenio Calabi and Shing-Tung Yau, who first described this shape in the 1970s.

3. How does the Calabi-Yau shape relate to extra dimensions?

In string theory, the Calabi-Yau shape is used to compactify the extra dimensions, meaning that it is believed to be the shape that these dimensions take on at a microscopic level. This shape is thought to play a crucial role in determining the properties and behavior of particles in our universe.

4. Why are extra dimensions important in physics?

Extra dimensions are important in physics because they offer a potential solution to some of the biggest mysteries in our universe, such as the unification of all fundamental forces and the existence of dark matter. They also provide a deeper understanding of the fundamental nature of reality.

5. Can we ever observe or interact with these extra dimensions?

At this time, there is no experimental evidence to support the existence of extra dimensions. However, some scientists believe that with advanced technology and further research, we may one day be able to observe or indirectly detect the effects of these dimensions on our universe.

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