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Eye appointment today

  1. Jun 6, 2013 #1

    turbo

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    I had an eye appointment this morning with a couple of doctors that I have previously worked with. Unfortunately, the staff continues to wear cosmetics and fragrances and I have been in misery all day. Migraines, COPD, and inflamed arthritis are not fun.

    I worked with many of those same people in an ophthalmic practice until the use of fragrances got too much to bear. These people are putting their fingers near patients' eyes, so why can't they catch a clue and treat patients fairly?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 6, 2013 #2

    Drakkith

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    What 'clue' are they supposed to catch?
     
  4. Jun 6, 2013 #3
    It's common knowledge that if you work in healthcare you don't wear fragrances because they can make many patients feel very sick (much worse than they already do). This is occasionally a problem where I work as well, though we have visual reminders posted everywhere. We've even had staff wear strong perfume and be given feedback about how it can negatively affect the patients we are serving...only to have them wearing perfume again within a few days.

    For whatever reason some people in healthcare seem to not get it.
     
  5. Jun 6, 2013 #4

    Drakkith

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    I see. I wasn't aware this was even an issue, much less such a big one.
     
  6. Jun 7, 2013 #5

    Evo

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    Some perfume is stinky, I hate musk, that was really popular for awhile. Any strong smell can bother people, make them sneeze, give them headaches, make them nauseous. It's not harmful, but it's unpleasant.
     
  7. Jun 13, 2013 #6

    turbo

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    Actually, it can be quite harmful. Anybody with MCS can explain how loss of breathing capacity, migraines, etc, can ruin their lives, and possibly land them in the ER for treatment.

    What is quite disturbing to me is that professionals with nursing degrees blithely apply their perfumes with their hands and then tend to eye patients. When they retract patients' eyelids, help them remove and re-install contacts, etc, they are exposing the patients' most sensitive body-parts to chemical injury.

    I avoid health-care "professionals" like the plague, and if I must be around them for some reason, I have an epi-pen in my pocket. For a while, I was treated by the most prominent chemical-injury doctor in the northeast. Unfortunately, he accepted a position at Dartmouth-Hitchcock, and I could no longer see him, since the staff there never got the word on fragrance-free. When he was in Exeter, I could visit him with no problems, but after one disastrous trip to D-H, I had to get my wife to drive me home from the follow-up. You wouldn't want to meet me on the road after I spiked myself with an epi-pen.
     
  8. Jun 13, 2013 #7

    Evo

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    Let's stick with the current medical view please.

    MCS is a psychological condition.

    Edit suggested by mentors: "MCS is not recognized, so your attacks can't be classified as MCS".

    Psychological effects can be harmful to your health.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multiple_chemical_sensitivity#Lack_of_widespread_recognition
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2013
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